Coconut Water


April 14, 2015

My daughter Nikki and her family enjoyed spring break in Miami Beach. Along the way my grandsons Matthew and Noah learned how to open a coconut to access it's water.

Recently, three clients mentioned their use of coconut water. One keeps it in her mouth for 10 minutes to get rid of bacteria and strengthen gums.




Coconut water is the clear liquid inside young green coconuts (fruits of the coconut palm). In early development, it serves as a suspension for the endosperm of the coconut during their nuclear phase of development. As growth continues, the endosperm mature into their cellular phase and deposit into the rind of the coconut meat. Coconuts for drinking are served fresh, chilled or packaged in many places. They are often sold by street vendors who cut them open with machetes or similar implements in front of customers. Coconut water can also be found in ordinary cans, tetra paks, or plastic bottles (sometimes with coconut pulp or coconut jelly included).

In recent years, coconut water has been marketed as a natural energy or sports drink having low levels of fat, carbohydrates, and calories. However, marketing claims attributing health benefits to coconut water are not supported by science and are disallowed by regulatory agencies, such as the United States Food and Drug Administration.

Unless the coconut has been damaged, it is likely sterile. There is a single documented case where coconut water has been used as an intravenous hydration fluid when medical saline was unavailable. Although this is not recommended by physicians today, it was a common practice during the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia from 1975 to 1979.

Coconut water has long been a popular drink in the tropics, especially in India, Brazilian Coast, Southeast Asia, Pacific Islands, Africa, and the Caribbean, where it is available fresh, canned, or bottled. In the Philippines, it is known as 'buko'. Read more




Love it, Like it, Hate it: Coconut Water   WGNO - April 10, 2015

More potassium than a banana: as much as 600 mg potassium per bottle/carton/can

Benefits of potassium: can help prevent muscle cramping and reduce blood pressure.

Per 8 ounces unflavored coconut water: ~40-70 calories, ~10 grams carbs, ~10 grams sugar (minimal amounts of protein or fat)





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