St. Patrick's Day



St. Patrick's Day is a cultural and religious holiday celebrated annually on 17 March, the death date of the most commonly recognized patron saint of Ireland, Saint Patrick (c. AD 385-461).

Saint Patrick's Day was made an official Christian feast day in the early seventeenth century and is observed by the Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion (especially the Church of Ireland), the Eastern Orthodox Church and Lutheran Church. The day commemorates Saint Patrick and the arrival of Christianity in Ireland, as well as celebrates the heritage and culture of the Irish in general.

Celebrations generally involve public parades and festivals, ceilithe, and the wearing of green attire or shamrocks. Christians also attend church services, and the Lenten restrictions on eating and drinking alcohol are lifted for the day, which has encouraged and propagated the holiday's tradition of alcohol consumption.

Saint Patrick's Day is a public holiday in the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, Newfoundland and Labrador and Montserrat. It is also widely celebrated by the Irish diaspora around the world; especially in Britain, Canada, the United States, Argentina, Australia and New Zealand. Read more ...








The north White House fountain has been dyed green for Saint Patrick's Day since 2009.




Dyeing the Chicago River Green


Chicago -- March 2014




Did St. Patrick Really Drive Snakes Out of Ireland?
National Geographic - March 15, 2014

It's the stuff of legend: The reptiles never existed on the Emerald Isle.




Taking a look at


Ireland

The Emerald Isle - The Island of Saints and Scholars





Megaliths in Ireland







St. Patrick's Day is an enchanted time

to transform winter's dreams into summer's magic.





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