Dogs



Dogs are wonderful for healing and therapy having empathic and compassionate qualities we all embrace. They seem to have a special bond with humans that allows gives them to telepathically communicate - a skill that most people can learn if it doesn't come naturally after spend time with one's dog. Dogs can be catalysts into higher frequency experiences.




There is nothing like the love, respect, kindness and understanding of a dog.




Some people look like their dogs or share similar personality traits




Some believe their dog has been with them in another lifetime
or may return in this one.




There is often a synchronicity that attracts dogs and their owners to each other. Some dogs remain with a family for a period of years, then one day they just seem to disappear in the sense of moving on to another family - the two families may or may not ever meeting. I have seen divorcing couples fight more about custody of their dog than their finances. Some people are buried with or near their dogs. The loss of a beloved dog can be as tragic as the loss of of family member or close friend.




The dog was the first domesticated animal and has been the most widely kept working, hunting, and pet animal in human history. Dogs' value to early human hunter-gatherers led to them quickly becoming ubiquitous across world cultures. Dogs perform many roles for people, such as hunting, herding, pulling loads, protection, assisting police and military, companionship, and, more recently, aiding handicapped individuals. This impact on human society has given them the nickname "man's best friend" in the Western world. In some cultures. In 2001, there were estimated to be 400 million dogs in the world. Read more ...




March 23

National Puppy Day




In the News ...





The world's first images of dogs are found on 8,000-year-old rocks in Saudi Arabia - and they're wearing leashes   Daily Mail - November 20, 2017

It seems that man's best friend has been leashed by humans for more than 8,000 years, if newly-discovered rock art is to be believed. Archaeologists have uncovered the image of a hunter drawing his bow surrounded by a pack of 13 dogs, two of which appear to be tethered, carved into ancient sandstone. The find, made in the Arabian Desert, is thought to be the oldest ever depiction of a dog, as well as such restraints being used to control them. Until now, the earliest evidence came from a wall painting in Egypt which is believed to date back around 5,500 years.




Modern domestic dog has a single geographic origin   PhysOrg - August 7, 2017
By analyzing the DNA of two prehistoric dogs from Germany, an international research team has determined that their genomes were the probable ancestors of modern European dogs. The study also suggests that all contemporary dogs have a common origin and emerged through a single domestication process of wolves 20,000 to 40,000 years ago.




The origin of man's best friend: Genetic map reveals how different dog breeds evolved around the world   Daily Mail - April 25, 2017

With nearly 400 breeds spanning almost every corner of the planet, dogs have long followed man on his travels. In a bid to piece together the complex evolution of dogs, researchers have looked at the genetic sequences of 161 modern breeds. The resulting map unearths new evidence that dogs travelled with humans across the Bering land bridge 15,000 years ago, and will likely help researchers identify disease-causing genes in both dogs and humans.




Westminster Dog Show: Rumor Wins Best in Show   New York Times - February 15, 2017
As Rumor, a German shepherd, took long, elegant strides around the ring at the 141st Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, she seemed to cover every inch of the green carpet. It was if there were no other dogs in the room, and soon that was indeed true as Rumor stood alone, earning best-in-show honors on Tuesday night at Madison Square Garden.




'Dogs mirror owners' personalities'   BBC - February 15, 2017
The idea that a dog takes on the personality of its owner has received scientific support. Researchers in Austria say dogs can mirror the anxiety and negativity of owners. And dogs that are relaxed and friendly can pass this on to humans, perhaps helping their owners cope with stress. More than 100 dogs and their owners underwent various tests, including measurement of heart rate and their response to threat. Saliva samples were also taken to measure cortisol levels, a marker for stress. The owners were then assessed for the big five hallmarks of personality: neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness and conscientiousness.




Was the First Dog Domesticated in Asia or Europe? Yes   NBC - June 3, 2016
People liked dogs so much they invented them not once, but twice. A genetic scan of ancient dogs suggests that humans domesticated pooches separately - once in Europe, and once in East Asia, researchers said. The DNA finding fits in with archaeological evidence that shows dogs on the far east and far west of the Eurasian continent, but not in the middle until thousands of years later.




First Puppies Born by in vitro fertilization   Science Daily - December 9, 2015
For the first time, a litter of puppies was born by in vitro fertilization. The breakthrough opens the door for preserving endangered canid species using assisted reproduction techniques. It could also enable researchers to eradicate heritable diseases in dogs.




  Chinese Scientists Have Created Gene-Edited Super Muscular Dogs   Epoch Times - October 22, 2015
According to a new study, scientists in China have successfully bred two beagles to have twice the muscle mass as usual by removing the myostatin gene.




Dogs 'can trace origins to Central Asia'   BBC - October 20, 2015
Today's dogs can trace their origins to Central Asia, according to one of the most comprehensive genetic surveys yet. Dogs are the most diverse animal on the planet - a legacy of thousands of years of selective breeding by humans. But they derive from wild wolves that were gradually tamed and inducted into human hunting groups - perhaps near Mongolia or Nepal.




What's Up With That: Why Does Your Dog Seem to Know What Time It Is?   Wired - July 30, 2014
Time is a human invention, at least in the way we normally think about it in terms of seconds, minutes, and hours. Can dogs, or other animals, actually understand time in the same way that we do? This is actually a very hotly debated question in animal research. Cognitive scientists are interested in the ways animals form memory, mostly because it helps us understand the way our own brains work. Researchers often break down our long-term memory into two categories. There's implicit memory, an unconscious muscle memory that we use to perform tasks we have learned and repeated many times in the past, like tying a shoelace or riding a bike. And there's declarative memory, where we store the personal experiences and factual information that make up the story of our lives.




Dogs at War: Three-Legged Dog Delivers Crucial Message in WWI   National Geographic - May 16, 2014
As long as men have been fighting wars, dogs have likely been somewhere on or near the battlefield. And more often than not, dogs have contributed bravely on the front lines, whether officially trained to do so or motivated by loyalty to soldiers. The history of war dogs is deep: The Corinthians used them with success against the Greeks. The Romans used dogs to guard their legions and raise alarms, as did Attila the Hun, who placed them around his camps for added protection.




Dogs Not as Close Kin to Wolves as Thought   Discovery - January 16, 2014
A widely held belief is that dogs evolved from gray wolves, but a new study finds that the common ancestor of dogs and wolves went extinct thousands of years ago. What's more, the extensive DNA analysis -- published in the latest PLoS Genetics -- found that dogs are more closely related to each other than to wolves, regardless of their geographic origin. The genetic overlap seen today between dogs and wolves is likely then due to interbreeding after dog domestication.




Giant George - The World's Tallest Dog Has Died   ABC - October 24, 2013

Giant George, verified as the world's tallest dog by Guinness World Records, died one month before his eighth birthday - October 17, 2013.
Giant George was a blue Great Dane previously recognized as the world's tallest living dog, and the tallest dog ever by Guinness World Records. There were originally conflicting media reports regarding his height, but the official measurement showed that he was three-quarters of an inch taller than the previous record holder, Titan (at 43 inches (110 cm) at the withers) and an inch shorter than the current record holder, Zeus.




American Dogs Come From Asia   Live Science - July 10, 2013

European colonization of the Americas brought smallpox, starvation and warfare that decimated indigenous populations. But the canine companions that crossed the Bering Strait with the ancient people who first settled the Americas have fared better, according to new research. A new genetic analysis of hundreds of American dog breeds reveals that the canines' ancient roots trace back to Asia. On average, less than 30 percent of their DNA comes from Europe, suggesting dogs came to the Americas with the ancient humans who established pre-Columbian civilizations.




OCD Dogs, People Have Similar Brains; Is Your Dog OCD?   National Geographic - June 11, 2013

Dogs and people with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) have similar brain abnormalities, suggesting that America's most popular pet may someday help doctors understand and treat human anxiety, a new study says.




Animal- Human Connection: Crucial in Human Evolution   Science Daily - July 21, 2010

It's no secret to any dog-lover or cat-lover that humans have a special connection with animals. But in a new journal article and forthcoming book, paleoanthropologist Pat Shipman of Penn State University argues that this human-animal connection goes well beyond simple affection. Shipman proposes that the interdependency of ancestral humans with other animal species -- "the animal connection" -- played a crucial and beneficial role in human evolution over the last 2.6 million years.




Cradle And Birthday Of The Dog Identified: East Asia 16,000 years ago   Science Daily - September 2, 2009

Previous studies in the field have indicated that East Asia is where the wolf was tamed and became the dog. It was not possible to be more precise than that. But now researchers at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm have managed to zero in on man's best friend. The time for the emergence of the dog conforms well with when the population in this part of the world went from being hunters and gatherers to being farmers, which was 10,000 to 12,000 years ago.




Where Did Dogs Become Our "Best Friends"?   National Geographic - August 4, 2009

DNA from scrappy dogs in African villages is raising doubts about a theory that dogs first became "man's best friend" in East Asia. Based on DNA evidence, scientists believe that domestic dogs originated from Eurasian gray wolves sometime between 15,000 and 40,000 years ago. Since the highest diversity should exist in the region where dogs first went from wolf to woof, the study seemed to suggest that the dog-human bond was forged in East Asia. That study included almost equal numbers of East Asian "breed" dogs and "village" dogs




Domestic dog origins challenged   BBC - August 4, 2009

The suggestion that the domestic dog originated in East Asia has been challenged. The huge genetic diversity of dogs found in East Asia had led many scientists to conclude that domestication began there. But new research published in the journal PNAS shows the DNA of dogs in African villages is just as varied. An international group of researchers analyzed blood samples from dogs in Egypt, Uganda and Namibia.




Dog understands more than 200 words BBC - June 11, 2004
A very smart collie dog named Rico has stunned German researchers by learning words with the apparent flair of a young child, Science magazine reports. Rico understands more than 200 words and can work out the meaning of new ones, by a process of elimination. What is more, Rico can often remember new words after a whole month - even though he has only heard them once before, the scientists claim.




Canine family histories revealed BBC - February 14, 2004
All 300 domestic purebred dog breeds fall into one of 10 major groupings, scientists have told a US conference. A study of genetics and even historical records has revealed how close the breeds are to each other and the order in which they emerged over millennia. Virtually all modern purebred dogs are thought to have evolved from just a handful of grey wolves in Asia about 15,000 years ago. Pressed into the service of humans, they were bred to bring out traits that would help them fulfill certain roles, such as hunting and guarding.




How Did Dogs Become Adept at Playing with Humans? National Geographic - February 6, 2004
Dog lovers know that man's best friend has an uncanny ability to understand and react to human actions. Clues to how dogs came to develop this ability lie somewhere in their evolutionary past, and learning the answer could shine light on our own development as humans. Harvard Anthropologist Brian Hare's journey into canine cognition began with a study of human development. "I was interested in how humans develop cognitive skills,' he told National Geographic News.. "What is it that allows us read social cues and understand communicative gestures?"




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