Ancestor Syndrome and Genetic Memory

Humanity is a biogenetic experiment or dream

It's all physics and math in a consciousness simulation.

The human brain is an electrochemical machine (computer) that responds to stimuli and is programmed for patterns of experience based on one's DNA codes. That said, when experiencing what we view as a past life, we may actually be looking at the experience of others in our bloodline or ethnic background. The events are almost always spikes on a grid - negative events that were left unresolved and attract our consciousness to resolve them. For example, I have seen myself in various roles in Nazi Germany - as I am Jewish and connect with events in that timeline, probably because they were less than 100 years ago. In my visions, I am not one of my deceased relatives but have played many roles, all of which I am Jewish and get killed. I have met people who were part of what I witnessed and can verify the places names, dates, and experiences I observed. My favorite role was a Jewish physicist who worked on time travel experiments in secret underground labs. Through the years I have met other people with the same memories and past life connections. It's just fun stuff as my soul travels the grids and seeks experiences.

Can you tap into your ancestral memories? Anyone can with practice. All you have to do is align your grid with another relative on your ancestral DNA tree (bloodline) then explore. Being in the right geographic location can also help memories surface.

Can ancestral memories influence our lives today? Only if you are programmed to believe they do. The New York Times article below takes us to metaphysical and psychological theory that says the past lives of our ancestors, influences what happens in this timeline.

Do we have to set things right from experiences our soul has had in another time, or unfinished from the genetic programming of our ancestors? No - though many people believe their misfortunes are a result of bad karma from other timelines. If your life is difficult, that is how you are programmed.

Physics and Quantum Entanglement - 2 objects that are entangled in time react the same way even when great distances apart. When you take this to reality at large, everything in the hologram is entangled by design.

A new study pinpoints the precise mechanism that turns the inheritance of environmental influences "on" and "off."

Biological mechanism passes on long-term epigenetic memories   Science Daily - March 28, 2016
According to epigenetics -- the study of inheritable changes in gene expression not directly coded in our DNA -- our life experiences may be passed on to our children and our children's children. Studies on survivors of traumatic events have suggested that exposure to stress may indeed have lasting effects on subsequent generations. But how exactly are these genetic "memories" passed on?

Researchers have been preoccupied with how the effects of stress, trauma, and other environmental exposures are passed from one generation to the next for years. Small RNA molecules -- short sequences of RNA that regulate the expression of genes -- are among the key factors involved in mediating this kind of inheritance. Dr. Rechavi and his team had previously identified a "small RNA inheritance" mechanism through which RNA molecules produced a response to the needs of specific cells and how they were regulated between generations.

Epigenetics is the study, in the field of genetics, of cellular and physiological phenotypic trait variations that are caused by external or environmental factors that switch genes on and off and affect how cells read genes instead of being caused by changes in the DNA sequence. Hence, epigenetic research seeks to describe dynamic alterations in the transcriptional potential of a cell. These alterations may or may not be heritable, although the use of the term "epigenetic" to describe processes that are not heritable is controversial. Unlike genetics based on changes to the DNA sequence (the genotype), the changes in gene expression or cellular phenotype of epigenetics have other causes. More than 100 cases of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance phenomena have been reported in a wide range of organisms, including prokaryotes, plants, and animals. Read more ...

Family Constellations also known as Systemic Constellations and Systemic Family Constellations is an alternative therapeutic method which draws on elements of family systems therapy, existential phenomenology and Zulu attitudes to family. In a single session, a Family Constellation supposedly attempts to reveal a previously unrecognized systemic dynamic that spans multiple generations in a given family and to resolve the deleterious effects of that dynamic by encouraging the subject to encounter representatives of the past and accept the factual reality of the past.

Family Constellations diverges significantly from conventional forms of cognitive, behavior and psychodynamic psychotherapy. The method has been described by physicists as quantum quackery, and its founder Bert Hellinger incorporates the pseudoscientific idea of morphic resonance into his explanation of it. Positive outcomes from the therapy have been attributed to conventional explanations such as suggestion and empathy.

Practitioners claim that present-day problems and difficulties may be influenced by traumas suffered in previous generations of the family, even if those affected now are unaware of the original event in the past. Hellinger referred to the relation between present and past problems that are not caused by direct personal experience as Systemic entanglements, said to occur when unresolved trauma has afflicted a family through an event such as murder, suicide, death of a mother in childbirth, early death of a parent or sibling, war, natural disaster, emigration, or abuse. The psychiatrist Ivn Bszrmnyi-Nagy referred to this phenomenon as Invisible Loyalties. Ancestor Syndrome

The author's great-aunt Luz, third from the left, top row,
was the guardian of the secret Sephardic Jewish identity of the Catholic Carvajals.

On the Trail of Inherited Memories   New York Times - August 19, 2012
Can a person "remember" the lives of forebears? Can genes carry the burden of generations? A reporter follow clues of a secret identity - of Sephardic Jewish ancestors who fled the Inquisition. There are scientific studies exploring whether the history of our ancestors is somehow a part of us, inherited in unexpected ways through a vast chemical network in our cells that controls genes, switching them on and off. At the heart of the field, known as epigenetics, is the notion that genes have memory and that the lives of our grandparents - what they breathed, saw and ate - can directly affect us decades later. The French psychologist Anne Ancelin Schutzenberger, now in her 90s, has spent decades studying what she calls the Ancestor Syndrome - that we are links in a chain of generations, unconsciously affected by their suffering or unfinished business until we acknowledge the past. Read more ...