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Viking Warrior Buried with Weapons Was a Woman   Live Science - February 20, 2019
The ancient warrior was given a prestigious Viking burial, complete with deadly Viking weapons, a bag of gaming pieces (possibly to represent military command) and two horses, one bridled for riding. This mighty warrior - long thought to be be a man - made headlines in 2017 when researchers in Sweden announced that the individual was, in fact, a woman. The intense scrutiny that followed caught the researchers by surprise. The barrage of questions from the public and other scientists was unrelenting: Were the researchers sure they had analyzed the right bones? Was there more than one body in the burial, of which one was surely a man? And if the warrior's sex was indeed female, is it possible they were a transgender man?




Mighty Viking Ax Discovered in Tomb of Medieval 'Power Couple'   Live Science - July 21, 2016
Archaeologists have discovered one of the largest Viking axes ever found, in the tomb of a 10th-century "power couple" in Denmark. Kirsten Nellemann Nielsen, an archaeologist at the Silkeborg Museum who is leading excavations at the site near the town of Haarup, said Danish axes like the one found in the tomb were the most feared weapons of the Viking Age. It's a bit extraordinary - it's much bigger and heavier than the other axes. It would have had a very long handle, and it took both hands to use it.




Viking Women Colonized New Lands, Too   Live Science - December 8, 2014
Vikings may have been family men who traveled with their wives to new lands, according to a new study of ancient Viking DNA. Maternal DNA from ancient Norsemen closely matches that of modern-day people in the North Atlantic isles, particularly from the Orkney and Shetland Islands. The findings suggest that both Viking men and women sailed on the ships to colonize new lands. The new study also challenges the popular conception of Vikings as glorified hoodlums with impressive seafaring skills.




Found, the Viking war lord buried in his boat: 1,000-year-old tomb of Norse invader and weapons of war   Daily Mail - October 19, 2011
Judging from the opulence of his tomb, he was a revered Viking warrior destined to take his place in Valhalla among the honored dead. Laid to rest in a 17ft boat with his sword, axe and bronze drinking horn, the powerful Norseman’s burial site has been discovered by archaeologists in a remote part of the Scottish Highlands. The grave, unearthed in Ardnamurchan, is the first of its kind to be found intact on the British mainland and is thought to date from 1,000AD – the height of the ‘Second Viking Age’.




Authentic Viking DNA Retrieved From 1,000-year-old Skeletons   Science Daily - May 28, 2008
Although "Viking" literally means "pirate," recent research has indicated that the Vikings were also traders to the fishmongers of Europe. Stereotypically, these Norsemen are usually pictured wearing a horned helmet but in a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen, investigated what went under the helmet; the scientists extracted authentic DNA from ancient Viking skeletons, avoiding many of the problems of contamination faced by past researchers.





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