Climate in Ancient Greece


Early Greeks lived on the outskirts of the land, always wanting to be as close to water as possible in order to make transportation and fishing easier. Because of this they may have had a more constant climate that they would have inland. This is due to the cooling properties of water and land. Land (as with almost any solid surface) cools faster than a liquid such as water. So around the water you receive a very softened climate. Water heats up slower and cools slower. A solid object on the other hand heats quicker and cools quicker.

Mountain regions in Greece as in any place have different climates from the places which surround them. As altitude increases it is like going up in latitude. It generally tends to get cooler. This cool air causes the air forced up over the mountain to cool also, causing it to lose its ability to hold its water. This causes the water to either fall out in the form of rain or (if cool enough) snow. This snow is important because it supplies the streams and rivers.

Rain, while sufficient, was not ample to produce grain crops.

Greeks grew dates and fruits.

Many Greeks raise sheep.

Their inability to raise sufficient food prompted the Greeks to become a sea-going nation which relied on foreign trade for grain to feed a growing population.




ANCIENT GREECE INDEX


ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS INDEX


ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF ALL FILES


CRYSTALINKS HOME PAGE


PSYCHIC READING WITH ELLIE


2012 THE ALCHEMY OF TIME