The Galactic Center August 15, 2011




I've always been fascinated with the galactic center
from a scientific and a pseudoscientific perspective.


Blending myth, math, and metaphor, the galactic center is the way home at the end of time or this consciousness hologram. It's about recently discovered unexplained tones emanating from the center, spiraling energies, and souls returning through the eye or black hole of the Milky Way Galaxy.


2012 Prophecy

On December 21, 2012, for the first time in approximately 26,000 years


The Sun will rise to conjunct the intersection of the Milky Way Galaxy and the Plane of the Ecliptic.


The sun aligning with the galactic center
is referred to as the Cosmic Cross.

According to the ancient Maya, this date will mark the end
of one world as we know it and the beginning of another.


According to researcher and author William Henry, "Stargate 2012" -- this alignment is considered to be an embodiment of the Sacred Tree, The Tree of Life, a Tree remembered as sacred in all the world's spiritual traditions. Emerging from this tree, or star alignment, comes a serpent (DNA) rope with an enlightened being named Nine (9, Closure) Winds (Wormholes, Spirals, StarGates, SG, Sacred Geometry). Nine Winds is Quetzalcoatl riding upon a blessed substance the Mayans called itz (literally 'the blessed substance') apparently spewing from it. In Mayan belief a serpent rope emerges from the center of the galaxy, symbolized by an 8-rayed or 8-spoked wheel. Cosmic sap oozes from this world tree or cosmic cross.

December 21, 2012




August 15, 1977 ... Today is the 34th anniversary of "Wow Signal".

Both the Galactic Center and "Wow Signal" are linked to Sagittarius.

On December 21, 2012 the Sun moves out of Sagittarius and into Capricorn.

  "Wow Signal" Google Videos

"Wow Signal" was a strong, narrowband radio signal detected by Dr. Jerry R. Ehman on August 15, 1977 while working on a SETI project at the Big Ear radio telescope of the Ohio State University. The signal bore expected hallmarks of potential non-terrestrial and non-solar system origin. It lasted for 72 seconds, the full duration Big Ear observed it, and has not been detected again, or not reported to the public. It has been the focus of attention in the mainstream media when talking about SETI results. Amazed at how closely the signal matched the expected signature of an interstellar signal in the antenna used, Ehman circled the signal on the computer printout and wrote the comment "Wow!" on its side. This comment became the name of the signal.


Was the Wow Signal our first detection of extraterrestrials? It might have been, but no scientist would make such a claim. Scientific experiment is inherently skeptical. This isn't just a sour attitude; it's the only way to avoid routinely fooling yourself. Until and unless the cosmic beep measured in Ohio is found, the Wow Signal will remain a What Signal.

Seth Shostak (SETI)

The Wow Signal came from the direction of Sagittarius.


Sagittarius and the Galactic Center




Science


Lost In The Galactic Core? There's a Map For That: Big Pic   Discovery - August 15, 2011

If you were aboard a starship capable of traveling deep into the galactic core, some 27,000 light-years from Earth, you'd be looking into a very alien volume of the Milky Way.

Dense with stars, your sky would be a veritable feast of bright star clusters and thick clouds of gas. You'd better hope your vehicle's shielding is up to the task; the central region of our galaxy will be humming with radiation in the form of ionizing cosmic rays and powerful X-rays from clutches of baby stars bursting to life. Oh, and be careful not to fall into that supermassive black hole.

Welcome to the Galactic Core. Try not to get lost.

With the help of astronomers from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), your journey just got easier. For the first time, the galactic core has been completely mapped using far-infrared data from the European Hershel Space Telescope. The image shows the location Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the intense radio wave emission source known to be the location of the Milky Way's supermassive black hole with a gargantuan mass of 4 million suns.

Around Sgr A* is a donut-shaped structure ("CND") approximately eight light-years across surrounding the inner volume of neutral gas and thousands of stars, all orbiting the black hole like bees around a hive. Extending 700 light-years around that are massive star-forming regions sparkling with luminous stars, giant molecular clouds and regions we don't fully understand.

So why map this exciting region of the Milky Way in near-infrared light? As the galactic core is choked with gas and dust, most wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation (including visible light) are blocked. However, infrared, radio and X-ray wavelengths can penetrate the murk.

"One span of the spectrum of particular interest to astronomers is the four octaves of infrared light from the short infrared band (just adjacent to the visible) to the submillimeter. It is precisely in this span that a large fraction of the universe emits most of its radiation -- the reason being that ubiquitous, cool dust absorbs starlight (and many other kinds of radiation) from sources and re-radiates it here, in this far-infrared band. The Herschel Space Telescope, launched last year, is a facility able to detect this light."

Therefore, Herschel data shows us structures in the center of the Milky Way that we've never seen before; the emissions from the cool dust can now be mapped. And by "cool," we mean very cool. The vast majority of the dust residing in this region has a temperature of 23 degrees Kelvin -- that's only 23 degrees above absolute zero. The near-infrared radiation generated by this dust has now been mapped, literally shining new light on this mysterious volume of our galaxy.


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The central region of the Milky Way   PhysOrg - August 15, 2011

The center of our Milky Way Galaxy is about 27,000 light-years away in the direction of the constellation of Sagittarius. At the very center of the galaxy lies a black hole whose mass is about four million solar masses.

Around it is a donut-shaped structure about eight light-years across that rings the inner volume of neutral gas and an estimated thousands of individual stars. Around that, stretching out to 700 light-years, is a dense molecular zone of activity, unique to the galaxy, with massive star forming clusters of luminous stars, giant molecular clouds, and many more, poorly understood regions as well.

There is so much obscuring dust between us and this region that visible light is extinguished by factors of over a trillion. Infrared, radio and some X-ray radiation, however, can penetrate the veil, and they have allowed astronomers to develop the picture just outlined.

One span of the spectrum of particular interest to astronomers is the four octaves of infrared light from the short infrared band (just adjacent to the visible) to the submillimeter. It is precisely in this span that a large fraction of the universe emits most of its radiation the reason being that ubiquitous, cool dust absorbs starlight (and many other kinds of radiation) from sources and re-radiates it here, in this far-infrared band. The Herschel Space Telescope, launched last year, is a facility able to detect this light.

CfA astronomers Mireya Extaluze, Howard Smith, Volker Tolls, Tony Stark, and Eduardo Gonzalez-Alfonso have used newly archived data from Herschel surveys of the region to publish the first complete far-infrared picture of the inner galaxy. The images reveal arcs, star clusters, and clumps of material, most of them previously known from radio observations, but all now seen in emission in the light of the cool dust they contain.

The astronomers model the dust emission, and find that previous observations had been unable to sense a cold but massive component whose temperature is only about 23 degrees above absolute zero. The team also finds that the character of the dust emission varies across the region, and that the total radiant output of the inner donut region alone is two million solar-luminosities. These results mark the beginning, not the end, of a detailed analysis of the various cool, dusty structures found near our galaxy's core.


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The Galactic Center is the rotational center of the Milky Way galaxy. It is located at a distance of 8.33 from the Earth in the direction of the constellations Sagittarius, Ophiuchus, and Scorpius where the Milky Way appears brightest. It is believed that there is a supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center of the Milky Way.




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