Fighting For Freedom 2011 Style




The fight for freedom is sweeping across the face of the Arab Nations as survival in the 21st makes the old ways impossible. Technology and social networking are giving people an understanding that the world unites on a global front to support their efforts. Everyone should rise up now in these energies and be free!


The The 2010 - 2011 Arab world protests are an unprecedented series of major uprisings, demonstrations and protests in the Arab countries of Tunisia, Algeria, Egypt, Yemen and Jordan, with minor incidents occurring in Mauritania, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Sudan, Syria, Iraq, Libya, and Morocco.

The protests have shared an extensive use of techniques of civil resistance in sustained campaigns involving strikes, demonstrations, and other such methods. The Tunisian and Egyptian protests have been referred to as revolutions. 2010 - 2011 Arab world protests are an unprecedented series of major uprisings, demonstrations and protests in the Arab countries of Tunisia, Algeria, Egypt, Yemen and Jordan, with minor incidents occurring in Mauritania, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Sudan, Syria, Iraq, Libya, and Morocco.

The protests have shared an extensive use of techniques of civil resistance in sustained campaigns involving strikes, demonstrations, and other such methods. The Tunisian and Egyptian protests have been referred to as revolutions.




Libya

The 2011 Libyan protests are anti-government protests which started on February 15, 2011 and continue to the present. Media outlets have reported the unrest as being inspired by the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia, connecting these protests with the wider 2010-2011 Arab world protests. It has been reported that up to 104 people have been killed in clashes with pro-government groups and the country's secret police, as of 20 February. On 18 February, protesters largely took control of the second largest city of Libya, Benghazi, with the support of some pro-protest police, military members, and tanks. In reaction, the government sent in elite troops, which are in turn being resisted by Benghazi inhabitants and defecting members of the Libyan military.




Tunisia

The 2010 - 2011 Tunisian revolution is an intensive campaign of civil resistance, including of a series of street demonstrations taking place in Tunisia. The events began in December 2010 and led to the ouster of longtime President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali in January 2011. Street demonstrations and other unrest have continued to the present day. The demonstrations were precipitated by high unemployment, food inflation, corruption, a lack of freedom of speech and other political freedom and poor living conditions. The protests constituted the most dramatic wave of social and political unrest in Tunisia in three decades and have resulted in scores of deaths and injuries, most of which were the result of action by police and security forces against demonstrators. The protests were sparked by the self-immolation of Mohamed Bouazizi on December 17 and led to the ousting of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali 28 days later on 14 January 2011, when he officially resigned after fleeing to Saudi Arabia, ending 23 years in power. Labour unions were said to be an integral part of the protests. The protests inspired similar actions throughout the Arab world: The Egyptian revolution began after the events in Tunisia and also led to the ouster of Egypt's president; protests have also taken place in Algeria, Yemen and Jordan.




Egypt

The Egyptian Revolution of 2011 is a revolution that began in Egypt on January 25, 2011, characterized by a series of street demonstrations, marches, rallies, acts of civil disobedience, riots, labour strikes, and violent clashes; the date was selected to coincide with the National Police Day. The protests were largest in Cairo and Alexandria, with significant activities in other cities of Egypt. At times over a million people were protesting to demand the overthrow of the Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, an end to corruption and police repression, and democratic reforms of the political system. The demonstrations and other actions in Egypt in this period were part of a campaign of civil resistance, a technique of struggle relying primarily on non-violent methods. On February 11th, Mubarak resigned from office as a result of determined popular protest. While localized protests had been common in previous years, the 2011 protests have been the largest demonstrations seen in Egypt since the 1977 Bread Riots and unprecedented in scope, drawing participants from a variety of socio-economic backgrounds and religions.




Algeria

The 2010 - 2011 Algerian protests are a continuing series of protests taking place throughout Algeria from January 2011 onwards, part of similar protests across the Arab world. Causes cited by the protestors include unemployment, the lack of housing, food-price inflation, corruption, restrictions on freedom of speech and poor living conditions. While localised protests were already commonplace over previous years, extending into December 2010, an unprecedented wave of simultaneous protests and riots erupted all over the country starting in January 2011. These were quelled by government measures to lower food prices, but were followed by a wave of self-immolations, most of them in front of government buildings. Opposition parties then began to hold demonstrations, despite being illegal without government permission while under a state of emergency.




Bahrain

Bahrain is known for its oil and pearls. The country is the home of many large structures such as the Bahrain World Trade Center and the Bahrain Financial Harbour and other skyscrapers, and proposes to build the 1,022 m (3,353 ft) high supertall Murjan Tower. The Qalat al-Bahrain (The Ancient Harbor and Capital of Dilmun) has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

2011 Bahraini Protests are a series of demonstrations in the Persian Gulf country of Bahrain. Part of the 20102011 Arab world protests, the Bahraini protests were initially aimed at achieving greater political freedom and respect for human rights, and expanded to a call to end the monarchy following a deadly night raid on 17 February against protestors at Pearl Roundabout in Manama.




Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Clashes in Bahrain before planned protest rally   MSNBC - February 14, 2011
Bahrain's security forces fired tear gas and rubber bullets Monday at thousands of anti-government protesters heeding calls to unite in a major rally and bring the Arab reform wave to the Gulf for the first time. The punishing tactics by authorities underscore the sharply rising tensions in the tiny island kingdom - a strategic Western ally and home to the U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet.




Iran

Police fire tear gas at Iranian protesters   MSNBC - February 14, 2011
Hundreds of Iranians marched toward a Tehran square on Monday in a banned rally supporting popular uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia, but their way was blocked by police and security forces, witnesses said. The march was a test of strength for the reformist opposition, which has not taken to the streets since December 2009, when eight people were killed. But Iranian security forces are still unlikely to hesitate to use all means to stop any protest.




Yemen

The 2011 Yemeni protests followed the initial stages of the Tunisian protests and occurred simultaneously with the Egyptian protests and other mass protests in the Arab world in early 2011. The protests were initially against unemployment, economic conditions and corruption, as well as against the government's proposals to modify the constitution of Yemen. The protestors' demands then escalated to calls for President Ali Abdullah Saleh to resign.

A major demonstration of over 16,000 protestors took place in Sana'a on 27 January. On 2 February, President Saleh announced he would not run for reelection in 2013 and that he would not pass power to his son. On 3 February, 20,000 people protested against the government in Sana'a, others protested in Aden,[13] in a "Day of Rage" called for by Tawakel Karman, while soldiers, armed members of the General People's Congress and many protestors held a pro-government rally in Sana'a.




Jordan

The 2011 Jordan protests -- a series of protests are taking place in Jordan, which resulted in the firing of the cabinet ministers of the government. Food inflation and salaries were a cause for resentment in the country. The 2010-2011 Tunisian uprising and 2011 Egyptian protests also raised hopes for political change in the region. Together with unrest elsewhere in the Middle East and North Africa, including the disturbances in Jordan and Yemen, they are part of the 2010-2011 Arab world protests also known as the domino effect of Arab unrest.




Sudan

A referendum took place in Southern Sudan from 9 January to 15 January 2011, on whether the region should remain a part of Sudan or become independent. The referendum was one of the consequences of the 2005 Naivasha Agreement between the Khartoum central government and the Sudan People's Liberation Army/Movement (SPLA/M). A simultaneous referendum was supposed to be held in Abyei on whether to become part of Southern Sudan but it has been postponed due to conflict over demarcation and residency rights. On 7 February 2011, the referendum commission published the final results, with 98.83% voting in favor of independence. While the ballots are going to be suspended in 10 of the 79 counties for exceeding 100% of the voter turnout, the number of votes are still well over the requirement of 60% turnout, and the majority vote for secession is not in question. The predetermined date for the creation of an independent state is July 9, 2011.




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