Earthquakes in the News ....





Scientists Pinpoint How to Calm Oklahoma's Human-Made Quakes   Live Science - November 30, 2016
Human-induced earthquakes have rattled Oklahoma in recent years, a state known more for its wide-open plains than havoc-wreaking temblors. But now, scientists said they may know how to calm the shaking. In a new study, researchers found that limiting the amount of wastewater pumped into wells deep underground could reduce the number of widely felt earthquakes measuring magnitude 3.0 or higher. This water is pumped as part of the oil and gas production process in Oklahoma and other states in the central and eastern United States. Injecting wastewater from oil and gas extraction into underground wells has occurred for decades in Oklahoma without raising concern over induced seismicity, but in 2009, the rate and volume of injection massively increased, according to the study. Researchers estimate that billions of barrels of wastewater were injected over the past six years into the Arbuckle formation, a highly permeable rock unit in Oklahoma that sits atop billion-year-old rocks containing numerous faults. In 2015, due to underground pressure buildup from injections, earthquake activity in parts of Oklahoma increased 900-fold compared to past levels, according to researchers.




The 7km abyss deep under the ocean: Biggest fault on Earth found inside the deadly 'ring of fire'   Daily Mail - November 28, 2016

It is a terrifying abyss, 7km deep. Now, geologists have for the first time seen and documented the Banda Detachment fault in eastern Indonesia - and worked out how it formed. It could lead to a breakthrough in tsunami prediction for the area, which is part of the Ring of Fire - an area around the Pacific Ocean basin known for earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.




Pacific Plate Quakes November 14-24


I dreamed about the Pacific Plate cracking again. It looks like a gigantic concrete shelf that rises up in front of me. Each time I "see" or dream about it, the plate rises higher and higher.


  Earthquake hits off coast of Central America   CNN - November 24, 2016

A 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of Central America on Thursday afternoon, the US Geological Survey said. The quake hit at a depth of 10.3 kilometers (6.4 miles) about 149 kilometers (93 miles) south-southwest of Puerto El Triunfo, El Salvador, USGS said.




  6.9-magnitude earthquake strikes off Japan + Aftershocks and possible Tsunami   CNN - November 22, 2016

A 6.9-magnitude earthquake struck off Japan's Honshu island on Tuesday, triggering tsunami waves and bringing back traumatic memories for locals of the devastating 2011 Fukushima disaster. Residents in Fukushima Prefecture braced for the worst after a tsunami warning was issued early Tuesday morning -- along the same stretch of coast devastated by enormous waves five years ago. In 2011, a 9.0-magnitude earthquake -- one of the worst ever to hit Japan -- killed more than 20,000 people and caused tsunamis of up to 12 meters (40 feet) which swamped the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, triggering a nuclear meltdown.




6.4 magnitude earthquake shakes western Argentina   CBC News - November 20, 2016

A magnitude 6.4 quake on Sunday hit western Argentina, northeast of Santiago, the capital of neighboring Chile, the U.S. Geological Survey said. The quake's epicenter was 16 miles (25.75 km) southwest of the Argentine town of San Juan, and about 180 miles (290 km) northeast of Santiago in Chile. The tremor was initially reported as a magnitude 6.7 but was later downgraded. Although a magnitude 6.4 is considered a strong earthquake capable of causing severe damage, it was fairly deep - 71.9 miles (115.71 km) below the Earth's surface, which would have lessened its effects.




  New Zealand Quake Ruptured 6 Faults   Live Science - November 21, 2016

The magnitude-7.8 quake that rattled New Zealand on November 14, killed at least two people and stranded thousands of others, completely transforming the underlying faults in the region. Six major faults ruptured as a result of the quake, a new map reveals. The Kaikoura earthquake struck the South Island of New Zealand early in the morning on Nov. 14 local time, triggering landslides, tsunamis and hundreds of aftershocks. And thousands of people were stranded when earthquake detritus dammed a river. During the quake, bystanders captured images of mysterious earthquake lights painting the sky in eerie blue and green.




Is this a statement about secret archives hidden under the Vatican about to be revealed but not by choice?

  Italy earthquake: 6.6-magnitude tremor rocks nation's center   CNN - October 30, 2016
A powerful 6.6-magnitude earthquake rocked central Italy on Sunday morning, according to the United States Geological Survey, sending residents running onto the streets in a panic. Rescuers were seen in the area around crumbling buildings soon after the tremor hit, helping evacuate a group of nuns from a building. They are working through aftershocks, striking every 20 minutes or so.


  Italy quake: Powerful tremor near Norcia destroys buildings   BBC - October 30, 2016

A strong earthquake has struck near Norcia in central Italy, destroying numerous buildings. The quake comes nearly two months after a major earthquake killed almost 300 people and destroyed several towns. The quake early on Sunday measured 6.6, larger than August's quake and aftershocks last week. It is thought to be Italy's most violent in decades. At least nine people have been hurt but no deaths are reported so far. Many locals left after last week's quakes. Nine people have been pulled alive from the rubble, Italian media say. Tremors were felt in the capital Rome, and as far away as Venice in the north. It was at a depth of only 1.5km (0.9 miles).


October 30, 2016

New Moon 7° Scorpio


Rare Halloween 'Black Moon' Explained  
National Geographic - October 28, 2016
Find out what a black moon is, where it will appear,
and why this year's dark orb is a celestial oddity.


New Moon in Scorpio in a Presidential Election Year



Hillary the Scorpio (October 26, 1947) was stung again by her emails.

Scorpio is ruled by Pluto. The energies of Pluto are transforming.
Pluto represents subconscious forces ruling all that is hidden
which must come forth. The truth will out. Scorpio is Rising ...




Italy earthquakes: Strong tremors shake central region   BBC - October 26, 2016

Two strong earthquakes have hit central Italy, damaging buildings and sending scared residents into the streets. A 5.5-magnitude quake struck at 1910 local time (1710 GMT) near Visso in Macerata province, officials said. It was followed two hours later by a 6.1 magnitude tremor in the same area. One person was hurt, but there were no immediate reports of deaths.




Entire Himalayan arc can produce large earthquakes   Science Daily - October 26, 2016

The main fault at the foot of the Himalayan mountains can likely generate destructive, major earthquakes along its entire 2,400-kilometer (1,500-mile) length, a new study finds. Combining historical documents with new geologic data, the study shows the previously unstudied portion of the fault in the country Bhutan is capable of producing a large earthquake and did so in 1714. The Himalayas have produced some of the world's largest earthquakes, like the April 2015 Gorkha earthquake.




New fault discovered in earthquake-prone Southern California region   PhysOrg - October 4, 2016

A swarm of nearly 200 small earthquakes that shook Southern California residents in the Salton Sea area last week raised concerns they might trigger a larger earthquake on the southern San Andreas Fault. At the same time, scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the Nevada Seismological Laboratory at the University of Nevada, Reno published their recent discovery of a potentially significant fault that lies along the eastern edge of the Salton Sea. The presence of the newly mapped Salton Trough Fault, which runs parallel to the San Andreas Fault, could impact current seismic hazard models in the earthquake-prone region that includes the greater Los Angeles area. Mapping of earthquake faults provides important information for earthquake rupture and ground-shaking models, which helps protect lives and reduce property loss from these natural hazards.




Scientists discover magma buildup under New Zealand town   PhysOrg - June 6, 2016
Scientists say they've discovered a magma buildup near a New Zealand town that explains a spate of recent earthquakes and could signal the beginnings of a new volcano - although they're not expecting an eruption anytime soon.




Economic losses from natural disasters counted   BBC - April 18, 2016

  Are the Ecuador and Japan earthquakes related?   CNN - April 18, 2016
Usually we don't think earthquake are connected across the ocean, but there's ongoing research in "remote triggering," the idea that a big quake can cause another quake a long distance away. The distance between Japan and Ecuador: 15,445 kilometers, or about 9,590 miles.

April 2016 Ecuador 7.8 earthquake


April 2016 Japan earthquakes




 
The quake-maker you've never heard of: Cascadia   CNN - February 11, 2016

Mother Earth slowly reveals her secrets, and this time, it's a fault line deep in the belly of the planet. Its name is a whopper: The Cascadia subduction zone. Its gargantuan size and potential power amaze earthquake experts, who say it could cause the worst natural disaster in the history of North America -- if it ruptures entirely. This quake-maker sits at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, where the seabed meets the North American tectonic plate. In all, it stretches 700 miles along the Pacific Northwest, from British Columbia's Vancouver Island to Washington to Oregon to northern California's Cape Mendocino. This quake-maker sits at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, where the seabed meets the North American tectonic plate. In all, it stretches 700 miles along the Pacific Northwest, from British Columbia's Vancouver Island to Washington to Oregon to northern California's Cape Mendocino.




Chances of Earthquake Hitting L.A. Area Soon: Like, for Sure   Live Science - October 21, 2015
The chance of a moderate-size earthquake striking the Los Angeles area soon is almost guaranteed, if a new study is correct. The Greater Los Angeles area has a 99.9 percent chance of having an earthquake of magnitude 5.0 or greater in the next two and a half years, thanks to several hidden faults that have built up considerable strain. But exactly where this next medium-size temblor could strike is less clear, because any one of the many faults that thread through the area could rupture.




September 17, 2015 Illapel earthquake   Wikipedia

  8.3 Chile quake: State of emergency declared for Coquimbo   BBC - September 17, 2015
Chile's government has declared a state of emergency in a central region struck by a powerful earthquake. One million people had to leave their homes and at least 11 people died when the 8.3-magnitude quake hit. In the coastal town of Coquimbo, waves of 4.7m (15ft) hit the shore. Small tsunami waves hit as far away as Alaska.

  Chile earthquake: 8.3-magnitude temblor strikes off coast, killing 5   CNN - September 17, 2015
A powerful 8.3-magnitude earthquake struck Chile, generating a nearly 16-foot wave, prompting the evacuation of about 1 million people and triggering tsunami advisories as far away as California. Authorities reported at least five deaths




Balancing rocks trace history of 'jumping' earthquakes   BBC - August 5, 2015

US scientists say they have solved the riddle of why a collection of balancing rocks near the San Andreas fault has never been toppled by earthquakes. Their decade-long study concludes that quakes can stop or "jump" due to interactions between the San Andreas and the neighboring San Jacinto fault. Models show that these interactions sent the biggest vibrations around the rock stacks, leaving them intact. But the connected nature of the faults has implications for quake planning.




Uplifted island   PhysOrg - June 22, 2015

The island Isla Santa María in the south of central Chile is the document of a complete seismic cycle. At the South American west coastline the Pacific Ocean floor moves under the South American continent. Resulting that through an in- and decrease of tension the earth's crust along the whole continent from Tierra del Fuego to Peru broke alongside the entire distance in series of earthquakes within one and a half century. The earthquake of 1835 was the beginning of such a seismic cycle in this area. After examining the results of the Maule earthquake in 2010 a team for the first time were able to measure and simulate a complete seismic cycle at its vertical movement of the earth's crust at this place.




Origin of Mysterious 'Cannon Earthquakes' in Red Sea Found   Live Science - June 15, 2015
Mysterious earthquakes that sound like cannon blasts have been puzzling people for decades, and now their origin has been traced way back to a giant block of volcanic rock hundreds of millions of years old, researchers say. For generations, Bedouin nomads living in the region of the Egyptian coastal resort Abu Dabbab, by the Red Sea, have heard noises that sound like cannon blasts accompanying small quakes in the area. The name of Abu Dabbab are Arabic words that mean 'the Father of Knocks,' which is related to the sound heard in this area.




Indian Subcontinent's Quake-Causing Collision Course   New York Times - May 18, 2015

In terms of plate tectonics, India is running into Asia at one and a half to two inches a year, leading to earthquakes. When an unstoppable force like the Indian subcontinent crashes into an immovable object like Asia, the consequences include the tallest mountains in the world and a cadence of earthquakes like the magnitude 7.8 one that struck Nepal last month and a major aftershock in the same region last week.




Magnitude-7.4 earthquake hits off the coast of Papua New Guinea   ABC - May 5, 2015
A magnitude-7.4 earthquake off Papua New Guinea has generated a small tsunami and caused minor damage to buildings in the town of Kokopo in East New Britain province. There have been no reports of injuries or major damage to infrastructure.





2015 Nepal earthquake   Wikipedia

The 2015 Nepal 7.8 earthquake (also referred to as the Himalayan earthquake) occurred at 11:56 NST on April 25, 2015. Its epicenter was approximately 34 km (21 mi) east-southeast of Lamjung, Nepal, and its hypocenter was at a depth of approximately 15 km (9.3 mi). It is the most powerful disaster to strike Nepal since the 1934 Nepal–Bihar earthquake. As of 27 April, more than 3,700 people are believed to have died as a result, with casualties reported in Nepal and adjoining areas of India, China, and Bangladesh.

The earthquake triggered an avalanche on Mount Everest, killing at least 17. The death toll surpassed that of the 2014 Mount Everest avalanche, making it the most lethal day on the mountain. Centuries-old buildings were destroyed at UNESCO World Heritage sites in the Kathmandu Valley, including some at the Kathmandu Durbar Square. Continued aftershocks occurred throughout Nepal, with one shock reaching a magnitude of 6.7 on 26 April at 12:54:08 NST.

Buildings in the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Kathmandu Durbar Square collapsed, as did the Dharahara tower, built in 1832, killing at least 180 people, and Manakamana Temple located in Gorkha. The northern side of Janaki Mandir has been reported to be damaged. Several temples, including Kasthamandap, Panchtale temple, the nine-storey Basantapur Durbar, the Dasa Avtar temple, Krishna Mandir and two dewals located behind the Shiva Parvati temple, were demolished by the quake. A few other monuments, including the Kumari Temple and the Taleju Bhawani, among others, have partially collapsed. The top of the Jay Bageshwori Temple in Gaushala and some parts of the Pashupatinath Temple, Swyambhunath, Boudhanath Stupa, Ratna Mandir, inside Rani Pokhari, and Durbar High School have been destroyed.


Nepal quake 'followed historic pattern'   BBC - April 27, 2015
Nepal's devastating magnitude-7.8 earthquake on Saturday was primed over 80 years ago by its last massive earthquake in 1934, which razed around a quarter of Kathmandu to the ground and killed over 17,000 people. This latest quake follows the same pattern as a duo of big tremors that occurred over 700 years ago, and results from a domino effect of strain transferring along the fault, geologists say.


Bigger Earthquake Coming on Nepal's Terrifying Faults   Live Science - April 27, 2015
Nepal faces larger and more deadly earthquakes, even after the magnitude-7.8 temblor that killed more than 4,000 people on Saturday (April 25). Earthquake experts say Saturday's Nepal earthquake did not release all of the pent-up seismic pressure in the region near Kathmandu. According to GPS monitoring and geologic studies, some 33 to 50 feet (10 to 15 meters) of motion may need to be released, said Eric Kirby, a geologist at Oregon State University. The earth jumped by about 10 feet (3 m) during the devastating April 25 quake, the U.S. Geological Survey reported.




Three Idaho quakes rattle residents from Washington to Montana   PhysOrg - April 24, 2015
Three earthquakes up to magnitude-4.2 and nearly a half-dozen aftershocks jolted northern Idaho, with residents from Washington state to Montana saying they felt the tremors. othing was damaged in the house during the quake that she estimated lasted several minutes. A second quake of magnitude-4.2 struck a little more than three hours later, waking up Hadley and her dog. That quake was centered 38 miles northeast of Hayden. Then, a magnitude-3.3 temblor hit at 1:28 a.m. Friday in the same area. Also Friday, a magnitude-6.1 earthquake struck British Columbia's north coast, but a tsunami was not expected and no injuries or damage were reported. After the Idaho temblors, hundreds of people logged onto the Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information website to report feeling them.




Washington Earthquake's Mysterious Source Discovered   Live Science - April 23, 2015
Geologists have finally solved a 142-year-old earthquake mystery in central Washington state. Until now, no one knew the source of a powerful earthquake that rattled windows from Washington to Montana on Dec. 14, 1872. The quake's size, based on historical accounts, was magnitude 6.8. At the time, newspapers put the epicenter in several areas, from underneath the Puget Sound north to Vancouver, British Columbia. But Washington's eyewitness reports, slower to arrive in the sparsely populated state, centered the most intense damage east of the Cascades, near Wenatchee, where a giant landslide temporarily dammed the Columbia River.




Enhancing earthquake early warning in the Pacific Northwest   PhysOrg - April 23, 2015
Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) systems depend on speed and accuracy in delivering seismic monitoring data to areas at risk from a quake or volcanic eruption. Paul Bodin of the University of Washington and colleagues have been testing models of EEW systems within the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) in Washington State and Oregon to learn more about what factors could be improved to provide the most timely warnings for their region. For instance, what's priorities are important for getting a speedy warning to those at risk: the placement of seismic monitoring stations, or the number of stations, or the speed at which data can be transmitted between stations and notification centers?




Titanic Blob of Magma Found Beneath Yellowstone Supervolcano   Live Science - April 23, 2015
A giant blob-shaped reservoir of searing-hot rock has been discovered far below the supervolcano underneath Yellowstone National Park - one that could fill the Grand Canyon more than 11 times over, researchers say. The discovery doesn't raise the risk of future eruptions at Yellowstone, the study authors said. However, a better understanding of the Yellowstone supervolcano's plumbing could shed light on any hazards it might pose, scientists added. The newfound blob-shaped magma reservoir lies in the lower crust. The molten rock extends from about 12 to 28 miles (19 to 45 kilometers) deep, and measures about 30 miles (48 km) long northwest to southeast and 44 miles (70 km) long southwest to northeast. This magma reservoir is about 11,200 cubic miles (46,700 cubic km) in size. Video 1





Earthquake potential where there is no earthquake history   PhysOrg - April 22, 2015
It may seem unlikely that a large earthquake would take place hundreds of kilometers away from a tectonic plate boundary, in areas with low levels of strain on the crust from tectonic motion. But major earthquakes such as the Mw 7.9 2008 Chengdu quake in China and New Zealand's 2011 Mw 6.3 quake have shown that large earthquakes do occur and can cause significant infrastructure damage and loss of life. So what should seismologists look for if they want to identify where an earthquake might happen despite the absence of historical seismic activity?




We pay attention to earthquake activity involving the Pacific Plate due to ongoing accelerating activity. Monday: Magnitude 6.9 Earthquake Hits Off Northeastern Coast Of Japan, Triggers Minor Tsunamis. It is also important to watch the movement of the North and South American Plates as indicators of bigger things to come. Pay attention to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge whose earthquake activity has increased rapidly in recent years. A larger earthquake can - and will - cause a tsunami.

7.1-magnitude earthquake hits North Atlantic Ocean   CBC - February 14, 2015

A 7.1-magnitude earthquake hit the mid North Atlantic on Friday - the largest one in 48 years. It happened along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge around 3:30 p.m. NT. The quake was closer to Greenland and Ireland than Newfoundland. It happened about 1,400 kilometres from Iceland, 1,500 kilometres from Ireland, and about 1,700 kilometres from the island. There have been five recorded earthquakes in that area in the last century. Prior to Friday's quake, the largest on record was a 7.0-magnitude quake in 1967. None of the earthquakes in that area are known to have caused any damage.




2.2 Magnitude Quake Is the 12th in a Week   NBC - January 15, 2015

The ground shook again in Eastern Connecticut on Thursday morning as the area experienced its 12th earthquake in a week. On Friday local and state officials will be holding meetings to inform residents and discuss how prepared the state is should a damaging earthquake strike here. The U.S. Geological Survey listed the earthquake at 4:39 a.m. in the Moosup section of Plainfield as a magnitude-2.2. Moodus is infamous for strange noises coming from the woods which have been termed "Moodus noises", and are attributed to shallow micro-earthquakes. Some residents think doomsday is coming - that this swarm of earthquakes a precursor to something larger. Not yet but their premonitions are correct.




Scientists record four small earthquakes in Connecticut   PhysOrg - January 12, 2015
Scientists on Monday recorded four small earthquakes within 20 minutes in the same area of eastern Connecticut, including a 3.1-magnitude tremor felt more than 60 miles away in Massachusetts. They followed two smaller quakes in the same area last week.




Worldwide Surge in 'Great' Earthquakes Seen in Past 10 Years   NBC - October 26, 2014

The annual number of "great" earthquakes nearly tripled over the last decade, providing a reminder to Americans that unruptured faults like those in the northwest United States might be due for a Big One.




Expect the Unexpected: More 9.0 Megaquakes Are Coming, Study Says   NBC - September 15, 2014
No one should be surprised if a magnitude-9 megaquake erupts off America's West Coast - or anywhere else around the Pacific Ocean's "Ring of Fire," for that matter. That's the upshot of a study in October's issue of the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America: Researchers say that computer models of future seismic activity, plus a check of past activity going back thousand of years, suggest most of the Pacific's earthquake zones are capable of generating shocks at least as strong as magnitude 9 every 10,000 years on average.




Mysterious Fissure Splits Ground in Mexico   Nature World - August 26, 2014
A Massive crack tore through more than a half-mile of ground in northern Mexico, according to numerous local reports. Now experts are struggling to explain what caused it and if it is a threat to public safety. The mysterious trench in question is up-to nearly 16 feet across at its thickets, and stretches for nearly half a mile according to Sky News, one of the first to report this unusual geological event. Hermosillo Sonora Mexico Emergency Management released footage taken by a drone flying over the perplexing crack while motorists remained stopped in their cars on either side of fissured roads as early as Wednesday. It is unclear when the earth was first broken, but residents of northern Mexico reported discovering the fissure earlier this week. Some local officials and experts alike are blaming seismic activity for the phenomenon, with a 5.0 magnitude earthquake occurring only earlier this month.




How the Napa Earthquake Deformed Earth   Live Science - September 3, 2014
The 6.0-magnitude earthquake that rocked California's Napa Valley last month not only injured dozens of people and caused millions of dollars in damage, but it also warped the surface of Earth. Satellites with radar vision can see how the Napa earthquake deformed the region from space. Observations from the European Space Agency's (ESA) new Sentinel-1A satellite reveal changes on the surface through a technique known as synthetic aperture radar interferometry.

  Strongest 6.1 quake in 25 years strikes California's Bay Area   CNN - August 24, 2014

2014 Napa Earthquake   Wikipedia
The 2014 Napa earthquake occurred in California, United States, at 10:20:44.00 UTC (3:20am local time) on August 24. The magnitude was measured 6.0 on the moment magnitude scale, and its epicenter was 3.7 miles (6.0 km) northwest of the city of American Canyon, near the West Napa fault. Significant damage was reported in the Napa area, sending at least 87 people to hospitals. More than 42,000 customers lost electric service. It was the largest earthquake to hit the San Francisco Bay Area in since the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake 25 years earlier.




6.9-magnitude quake strikes Peru, USGS says   CNN - August 24, 2014
A strong earthquake struck southern Peru on Sunday evening, injuring at least two people and damaging buildings, authorities said. A house was destroyed and 19 other buildings were damaged, including a hospital, Peru's Emergency Operations Center said. The 6.9-magnitude earthquake hit a mountainous area 43 kilometers (27 miles) east-northeast of Tambo at a depth of 101 kilometers (63 miles), according to the U.S. Geological Survey. 5 most powerful recorded earthquakes The USGS revised down the quake's strength from the magnitude of 7.0 that it initially reported, as well as adjusting its data on the location and depth of the epicenter.




Odds of major quake in Oklahoma growing, here's why   USGS - August 22, 2014

The rate of earthquakes recorded in Oklahoma has increased remarkably in less than a year, the U.S. Geological Survey warned - three months ago - that the chances of a damaging temblor in Central Oklahoma have increased significantly. Further, the federal agency reported that a statistical analysis indicates oilfield wastewater injected into deep geological formations is a likely contributing factor to the increased number of quakes.




Iceland volcano: Eruption under ice-cap sparks red alert   BBC - August 24, 2014

Strong quakes around Bardarbunga Volcano   BBC - August 24, 2014
Two new earthquakes have shaken the Bardardunga volcano in Iceland, which is already under a "red alert" aviation warning because of fears an eruption. They are the strongest earthquakes to hit the volcano since seismic activity began on Tuesday. Authorities said there had not been a major eruption but have closed the airspace in the area as a precaution. Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano erupted in 2010, producing ash that disrupted air travel across Europe.




  Earthquakes on Arizona-N.M. border felt in Valley   AZCentral - June 29, 2014

Four earthquakes occurred overnight between around 10 p.m. Saturday and 7:30 a.m. Sunday along the Arizona-New Mexico border ranging from a 3.4- to 5.2-magnitude, according to the United States Geological Survey. The earthquakes all occurred within the same general location, about 30 miles northwest of Lordsburg, N.M. The largest earthquake, a 5.2-magnitude, occurred around 10 p.m. on Saturday, followed by a 3.5, 3.4 and 3.6-magnitude earthquake that finished Sunday morning, according to USGS. The earthquake occurred within the North American tectonic plate and was caused by a normal spreading of the plate, Presgrave said. He said it is not uncommon to see such instances in the region where the earthquakes occurred due to a gradual spreading of the rock. Arizona residents in Graham County, Safford, Tucson, Gilbert, Mesa, Chandler and other areas have reported feeling the tremor.




Big Earthquakes Double in 2014, But They're Not Linked   Live Science - June 28, 2014

If you think there have been more earthquakes than usual this year, you're right. A new study finds there were more than twice as many big earthquakes in the first quarter of 2014 as compared with the average since 1979.




Photo Journal: The Gorgeous San Andreas Fault   Live Science - June 28, 2014

The San Andreas Fault is the most famous fault in the world. In the Colorado Desert of Southern California it begins near the Salton Sea and expresses itself in parts of the Coachella Valley by a range of small mountains, known as the Indio Hills that are fractured and run in various directions as a result of the collision of the Pacific and North American Continental Plates.




May 2014

We always follow events in the Pacific but now let's have a look at the Atlantic.

Very strong 6.0 earthquake out of the coast of Guadeloupe (Caribbean)   Earthquake Report.com - May 16, 2014
he image below shows the Atlantic North American oceanic plate who moves to the West and a Caribbean plate who moves to the East. The oceanic plate dives below the arc with the islands and sometimes hangs (instead of gradually creeping below it). When the energy gets too big the friction area breaks and an earthquake is generated.

Strong Earthquake Shakes Guadeloupe, Antigua and Barbuda   Carib Journal - May 17, 2014
A strong 6.0-magnitude earthquake caused shaking in Antigua and Barbuda and Guadeloupe on Friday morning, according to data from the United States Geological Survey. The quake struck at around 7:01 AM local time at a depth of about 24 kilometres. Its epicentre was 113 kilometres northeast of Grand Anse in Guadeloupe and about 155 kilometres east of St John's, Antigua and Barbuda. It was the latest in a string of moderate to strong earthquakes in the Caribbean region in recent months. It was the strongest earthquake in the Caribbean Sea since a 6.4-magnitude quake struck Puerto Rico in January. The quake was followed by several aftershocks of around 4.8 to 5.0 magnitude on the Richter scale. There were also reports of shaking around the Eastern Caribbean region, including in Dominica.

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The Pacific Plate is coming apart - with the plates sliding over one another. If you're following the news ... from Antarctica north along the Pacific Rim into Canada ... you realize the intensity of earthquake activity - highlighted Tuesday with a 6.8 Earthquake Hits off Panama. Earthquakes along the Pacific rim are no longer in the 4's and 5's but the 6's and 7's. As you know large earthquakes trigger tsunamis. The headline story this week is about the unstoppable Antarctica collapse. It won't be long now. Read more ...




Ring of Fire Earthquakes March-April 2014



The tectonic plates continue to break up in the notorious Pacific Ring of Fire with an increase in magnitude. Currently we find a 6.9 earthquake off the coast of northern California. Over in the Puerto Rico trench we also find an increase in seismic activity causing earthquakes in Cuba.




Up and down and all around ... the Pacific Plate is moving fast and furious.

Ring of Fire Earthquakes March-April 2014

April 23, 2014

Glass rattled, buildings swayed, but no damage was reported after a magnitude 6.6 earthquake hit off the northern coast of Vancouver Island on Wednesday night. Two aftershocks were reported in the hour following the quake. The first was magnitude 5.0 at 8:20 p.m. and the second magnitude 4.2 at 8:41 p.m. A third aftershock, at 4.2, was recorded at 10:16 p.m. - CBS News

Spike in Earthquakes? An 'Illusion' Raises New Questions   NBC - April 21, 2014
Some of the best minds in earthquake science have been counting quakes and analyzing seismic waves to see if the largest in a string of recent quakes - the magnitude-8.2 tremor in Chile on April 1 - might have triggered others far, far away. Experts for years have known that the seismic waves from one quake can trigger a quake somewhere else - a process known as "dynamic triggering."




Papua New Guinea

7.5-magnitude quake strikes off Papua New Guinea   CNN - April 19, 2014
An earthquake struck late Saturday off Papua New Guinea's eastern coast with a preliminary magnitude of 7.5, the U.S. Geological Survey said. The quake struck at 11:27 p.m. (9:27 a.m. ET) and occurred at a depth of 19 miles (32 km), the USGS said. It was centered 47 miles (75 km) southwest of Panguna, Papua New Guinea. After the quake, the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center issued a tsunami warning for Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands, but then canceled it.

After an earthquake hit the Solomon Islands at 6:28 a.m. Saturday, April 19, the National Weather Service issued a statement that the earthquake poses no tsunami danger to Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, Alaska or California. The earthquake's magnitude was recorded at 7.8, with depth of 6 miles. According to the National Tsunami Warning Center, had the earthquake triggered a tsunami, it would take about 14 hours to reach the Pacific Northwest coast. The region has suffered from a slew of major earthquakes this month, and the Solomon Islands were hit with devastating flash floods earlier in April.




Mexico

  7.5 magnitude earthquake strikes in southern Mexico   CNN - April 18, 2014
A powerful earthquake shook central and southern Mexico on Friday. The US Geological Survey calculated its magnitude at 7.5 and said it was centered near the Pacific resort of Acapulco, where many Mexicans are vacationing for the Easter holiday. An Associated Press reporter said it was felt strongly in the resort city but there were no immediate reports of injuries or damage. The quake shook Mexico City for at least 30 seconds, with buildings swaying as people fled high rises and took to the streets. Because of the Easter holiday, that city was less crowded than usual. Mexico City is vulnerable even to distant earthquakes because much of it sits atop the muddy sediments of drained lake beds that quiver as quake waves hit.




Nicaragua

New Quake Shakes Nicaragua; Nation on Alert   Live Science - April 11, 2014
Another powerful earthquake hit Nicaragua today (April 11), less than a day after an earthquake caused widespread damage and injuries in the capital of Managua and surrounding towns. The magnitude-6.6 temblor struck today at 2:29 p.m. local time according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Yesterday, a magnitude-6.1 earthquake hit at 5:27 p.m. local time. The magnitude-6.6 quake's epicenter was about 15 miles (24 kilometers) south of Granada. The earthquake originated 86 miles (139 km) deep, much deeper than yesterday's damaging temblor, the USGS reports. The quake was felt widely, including in El Salvador and Costa Rica. More than 250 people were injured during Thursday's earthquake and one woman died of a heart attack, according to SINAPRED, the national disaster management agency.




Chile

April 2, 2014 Iquique 8.2 earthquake   Wikipedia

  Chile leader evacuates as 7.6 second big quake strikes   BBC - April 3, 2014

  Chile quake: This was big but a bigger one awaits, scientist says   CNN - April 2, 2014

Chile's Recent Earthquake Defied Expectations   Scientific American - April 23, 2014
Monika Sobiesiak wasn't expecting the morning of April 2 to start with such an adrenaline jolt. But as she scrolled through a list of earthquakes on her mobile phone, she saw that overnight a series of quakes had rocked the coast of northern Chile - almost exactly where she had installed a seismometer network a few years earlier.




California


  5.1 Earthquake felt in Los Angeles area of California   BBC - March 17, 2014
The quake happened at about 21:10 local time on Friday (04:10 GMT on Saturday) and its epicentre was 1 mile (2km) east of the town of La Habra.




Magnitude 6.9 earthquake hits 50 miles west of Eureka   NBC - March 10, 2014
A magnitude-6.9 earthquake struck off the coast of Northern California on Sunday night, the U.S. Geological Service reported. The epicenter was 48 miles west-northwest of Ferndale and 50 miles west of Eureka at a depth of 4.3 miles, the USGS said.

Strong Earthquake Shakes Northern California   Live Science - March 10, 2014
An earthquake of preliminary magnitude 6.9 struck last night off the coast of northern California, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Shaking was felt across the region as far south as the San Francisco Bay Area and as far north as Eugene, Oregon. There were no immediate reports of damage and no tsunami warnings were issued.




Peru


Magnitude 6.3 earthquake strikes northwestern Peru   Reuters - March 25, 2014
A magnitude 6.3 earthquake struck northwestern Peru near its border with Ecuador on Saturday, the U.S. Geological Survey reported. Peru's National Civil Defense Institute (INDECI) said it had not received reports of serious damage or injuries, and authorities did not issue a tsunami alert. The quake struck at 6:51 p.m. local time (2351 GMT). Its epicenter was 28 miles south-southwest of Piura and it occurred at a depth of 6.1 miles, the USGS said. Brazilian construction company Odebrecht SA said its $700 million irrigation project in the area was unaffected. Still, the quake jolted the northern coastal region of Peru, with local media reporting that some people ran into the street after the tremor, fearing their homes could cave in. A witness on local radio RPP said the cross on the dome of a local church fell off. The quake was also felt in parts of neighboring Ecuador, according to Peruvian newspaper El Comercio.

Geologist warns that Peru's next earthquake could be a big one   Peru This Week - March 25, 2014
Geologist Patricio Valderrama warns that Peru's latest tremors are a sign that the next earthquake will be a big one. There have been more than 50 tremors in Peru over the past few days, something which Peruvian geologist and volcanologist, Valderrama suggests could mean that a big earthquake is on its way. Valderrama says that there has been a long seismic silence in Tumbes, Piura, Lambayeque, Lima, and Tacna, with only small tremors taking place for a while.

"The small tremors don't release the energy of a bigger one. To release the same amount of energy required for one (an earthquake) of 8 (on the Richter scale), there would need to be30 (earthquakes) of 7," he said to '90 segundos matinal' of Frecuencia Latina. This means that the small quakes are a warning that later there will be a large scale earthquake in Peru that will affect all parts of the country, according to Peru.Com. "Our preparation must be constant," Valderrama added. A major concern is that some buildings, particularly in slum areas, will not be able to withstand a heavy earthquake. Valderrama said that with an earthquake registering 8 or more on the Richter scale, 70% of homes would collapse, potentially causing the deaths of thousands. While not wanting to be alarmist, Peru this Week would like to advise our readers in Peru to be prepared for an earthquake, with an emergency kit and escape route organized.




Cuba and the Puerto Rico Trench


Puerto Rico Trench   Wikipedia

Earthquakes and Cuba   Local 10 News - March 10, 2014
Over the weekend, another earthquake hit near Corralillo, Cuba, approximately 110 miles east of Havana. This was the fourth earthquake since a magnitude 5.0 impacted the same area in January. The recent tremor was a magnitude 4.7, not exactly a major quake but enough to stir the curiosity. The truth is that Cuba is a seismically active area with a history of major earthquakes, some in excess of 7.0. However, most of Cuba's quakes are expected to occur along the southeastern coast.

In 1766, a major quake with a magnitude of 7.6 rocked the area near Santiago de Cuba. The recent quakes east of Havana are rare and have been felt all the way up into the Keys and parts of Broward County.To understand why this is happening, we have to zoom out and focus on the big picture. Hundreds of millions of years ago, the world's continents were one giant landmass known as Pangaea. Over time, a giant rift occurred tearing these continents apart. Have you ever noticed how the coastlines of the America's line up with the coastlines of Europe and Africa? This separation of landmasses continues today through the process of plate tectonics.

Our continents are sitting on plates that are constantly shifting and moving. For example, there is the North American plate, the African plate and so on. The most recent quakes in Cuba have occurred in a place where the North American plate borders the Caribbean plate. These two plates have been pressing against each other, creating the Cuban Fold and Thrust Belt. This type of fault is very rare but obviously capable of releasing energy. The Caribbean is a hotbed for seismic activity. In 2010, the catastrophic magnitude 7.0 quake that slammed Haiti killed more than 160,000 people. In 1995, the volcano on the island of Montserrat forced the permanent exodus from the capital, Plymouth. While northern Cuba is on the extreme northern fringe of the Caribbean seismic map, it serves as a reminder that this old planet of ours is constantly moving and changing. You and I are just going along for the ride.




Spike in Earthquakes? An 'Illusion' Raises New Questions   NBC - April 21, 2014
Some of the best minds in earthquake science have been counting quakes and analyzing seismic waves to see if the largest in a string of recent quakes - the magnitude-8.2 tremor in Chile on April 1 - might have triggered others far, far away. Experts for years have known that the seismic waves from one quake can trigger a quake somewhere else - a process known as "dynamic triggering."

It is postulated that large earthquakes can have an influence outside of the immediate aftershock zone, and remotely trigger earthquakes at considerable distances. The further one gets from the initiating earthquake in both space and time, the more controversial is the association. Read more ...




Scientists puzzled by recent flurry of quakes in central Idaho   EP- April 16, 2014
Three portable seismographs will be installed in the Challis area in central Idaho to help experts better understand a recent flurry of earthquakes. The U.S. Geological Survey has recorded a sequence of quakes rumbling the area, the largest of them being a 4.1-magnitude quake on Thursday, a 4.9 quake on Sunday and a 4.4 on Monday. Smaller quakes have also been recorded, including five on Monday ranging from 2.5 to 3.3 in magnitude.




Rare Earthquake Strikes Southern France   Live Science - April 7, 2014
An earthquake of preliminary magnitude 5.0 shook southern France today (April 7), according to France's National Seismic Monitoring Network. The earthquake's epicenter was about 30 miles (50 kilometers) from the resort city of Nice and 69 miles (111 km) from Monaco. The quake originated 7 miles (11 km) deep and struck at 9:27 p.m. local time (19:27 UTC), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reports. The USGS automated earthquake detection network calculated a preliminary magnitude of 4.7 for the temblor.




Earthquake Rattles Yellowstone National Park, No Damage Reported   NBC - March 30, 2014

A 4.8 magnitude earthquake rocked Yellowstone National Park in Montana early Sunday, but there were no immediate reports of damage.

Yellowstone Supervolcano   Crystalinks




1964 Alaska earthquake   Wikipedia
The 1964 Alaskan earthquake, also known as the Great Alaskan Earthquake and Good Friday Earthquake, was a megathrust earthquake that began at 5:36 P.M. AST on Good Friday, March 27, 1964. Across south-central Alaska, ground fissures, collapsing structures, and tsunamis resulting from the earthquake caused about 139 deaths. Lasting nearly three minutes, it was the most powerful recorded earthquake in U.S. and North American history, and the second most powerful ever measured by seismograph. It had a moment magnitude of 9.2, making it the second largest earthquake in recorded history - the largest being the 1960 Valdivia earthquake in Chile.


11 Facts About the 1964 Alaska Earthquake   Live Science - March 27, 2014
1. Of the 131 people killed during the earthquake, 119 died in tsunamis. Most were killed by tsunamis triggered by underwater landslides, not by the earthquake-induced tsunami.

2. In Chenega, 25 of the village's 76 residents drowned in a tsunami. The only building that survived the wave intact was the schoolhouse, built 100 feet (30 meters) above sea level.

3. Several towns and villages were moved to safer ground after the tsunamis, including Seward, Valdez, Girdwood and Chenega.

4. The tallest tsunami wave height was 219 feet (67 m) in Shoup Bay in the Valdez Inlet. <> 5. The world rang like a bell for several weeks from the earthquake waves.

6. Seiche waves, sloshing of water back and forth in a small body of water like a boat harbor or swimming pool, were noted as far away as Louisiana, where a number of fishing boats were sunk. Oscillations in the height of water in wells were reported as far away as South Africa.

7. The earthquake initially had a magnitude of 8.5 on the Richter scale. The moment magnitude scale, a better measure of seismic power, has since superseded the Richter scale. The new size estimate is magnitude 9.2, the second most powerful ever recorded.

8. If the energy of a magnitude-5 earthquake is like snapping a single spaghetti strand, then a magnitude-9.2 earthquake releases enough energy to snap 800,000 spaghetti strands, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

9. The damage totaled about $300 million in 1964 dollars ($2.3 billion in 2013 dollars).

10. Four out of five earthquakes in the United States occur in Alaska.

11. After the 1964 megathrust earthquake, three-quarters of the Aleutian subduction zone ruptured in a span of eight years. The subduction zone is 2,100 miles (3,300 kilometers) long.


How the 1964 Alaska Earthquake Shook Up Science   Live Science - March 27, 2014
There were great horrors, but what many children remember is missing their supper. The earthquake struck at 5:36 p.m. Alaska Standard Time on Good Friday. When the first shaking hit, many parents were in the kitchen, fixing dinner. For more than 4 minutes, the earth buckled and lurched all across southern Alaska. Few people returned home to their meals that night. In Anchorage, the ground cracked open and giant fissures swallowed children whole, killing them in front of their siblings. Landslides launched tsunamis that swept away coastal villages before the shaking even ended. In Seward, spilled oil slicked the water and caught fire. When the earthquake-triggered tsunami hit minutes later, the wave was blazing. "It was an eerie thing to see - a huge tide of fire washing ashore," survivor Gene Kirkpatrick told National Geographic magazine in 1964. In 50 years, no earthquake since has matched the power of the March 27, 1964, Great Alaska earthquake. Now ranked a magnitude 9.2, the second-largest ever recorded, the earthquake radically transformed the young state. Important coastal ports, roads and rail lines were destroyed. The liquefied ground in Anchorage led to the country's strictest seismic building codes (now outpaced by California). President Lyndon Johnson ordered a comprehensive scientific study of the earthquake.




California Earthquakes March 2014


  5.1 Earthquake felt in Los Angeles area of California   BBC - March 17, 2014
The quake happened at about 21:10 local time on Friday (04:10 GMT on Saturday) and its epicentre was 1 mile (2km) east of the town of La Habra.

  Magnitude 4.4 earthquake felt near Los Angeles   BBC - March 17, 2014
The US Geological Survey (USGS) recorded the 4.4-magnitude quake 9km (5.6 miles) from the Los Angeles neighborhood of Westwood. It struck at 06:25 local time (13:25 GMT). No severe damage, injuries or deaths have been reported. A USGS spokeswoman said it was the strongest earthquake in Los Angeles since the last aftershocks from the 1994 Northridge quake.

What Caused the Los Angeles Earthquake   Live Science - March 18, 2014
A small crack unzipped Monday (March 17) under the Santa Monica Mountains north of Los Angeles, waking millions of people with Southern California's largest earthquake in years. The fracture that caused the earthquake was not on a significant fault and is unlikely to be a new source of major earthquakes, said Caltech seismologist Egill Hauksson. (An earthquake is a sudden movement that releases stored energy on a fault.) Instead, the break likely is a bit player in California's tectonic drama, a minor crack in tortured crust being squeezed between two tectonic plates. There are thousands of small, unnamed faults in Southern California.

New anchors Chris Schauble and Megan Henderson wasted no time before ducking and covering.




Magnitude 6.9 earthquake hits 50 miles west of Eureka   NBC - March 10, 2014
A magnitude-6.9 earthquake struck off the coast of Northern California on Sunday night, the U.S. Geological Service reported. The epicenter was 48 miles west-northwest of Ferndale and 50 miles west of Eureka at a depth of 4.3 miles, the USGS said.


Strong Earthquake Shakes Northern California   Live Science - March 10, 2014
An earthquake of preliminary magnitude 6.9 struck last night off the coast of northern California, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Shaking was felt across the region as far south as the San Francisco Bay Area and as far north as Eugene, Oregon. There were no immediate reports of damage and no tsunami warnings were issued.




Earthquakes and Cuba   Local 10 News - March 10, 2014
Over the weekend, another earthquake hit near Corralillo, Cuba, approximately 110 miles east of Havana. This was the fourth earthquake since a magnitude 5.0 impacted the same area in January. The recent tremor was a magnitude 4.7, not exactly a major quake but enough to stir the curiosity. The truth is that Cuba is a seismically active area with a history of major earthquakes, some in excess of 7.0. However, most of Cuba's quakes are expected to occur along the southeastern coast.

In 1766, a major quake with a magnitude of 7.6 rocked the area near Santiago de Cuba. The recent quakes east of Havana are rare and have been felt all the way up into the Keys and parts of Broward County.To understand why this is happening, we have to zoom out and focus on the big picture. Hundreds of millions of years ago, the world's continents were one giant landmass known as Pangaea. Over time, a giant rift occurred tearing these continents apart. Have you ever noticed how the coastlines of the America's line up with the coastlines of Europe and Africa? This separation of landmasses continues today through the process of plate tectonics.

Our continents are sitting on plates that are constantly shifting and moving. For example, there is the North American plate, the African plate and so on. The most recent quakes in Cuba have occurred in a place where the North American plate borders the Caribbean plate. These two plates have been pressing against each other, creating the Cuban Fold and Thrust Belt. This type of fault is very rare but obviously capable of releasing energy. The Caribbean is a hotbed for seismic activity. In 2010, the catastrophic magnitude 7.0 quake that slammed Haiti killed more than 160,000 people. In 1995, the volcano on the island of Montserrat forced the permanent exodus from the capital, Plymouth. While northern Cuba is on the extreme northern fringe of the Caribbean seismic map, it serves as a reminder that this old planet of ours is constantly moving and changing. You and I are just going along for the ride.



Hello, Hot Stuff! New Hawaii Magma Source Found   Live Science - February 4, 2014
Hawaii's Kilauea volcano conceals a deeply buried magma chamber beneath its East Rift Zone, where lava hasn't stopped streaming from the surface for 31 years, a new study reports. The chamber's molten mush, about 90 percent crystal and 10 percent magma, sits in oceanic crust about 5 to 7 miles (8 to 11 kilometers) beneath Kilauea's south slopes. The deep magma system may help lubricate the volcano's ongoing collapse into the ocean.




Earthquake lights linked to rift environments, subvertical faults   PhysOrg - January 2, 2014
EQL take a variety of forms, including bright going spheres of light floating through the air - often purple or pink. Rare earthquake lights are more likely to occur on or near rift environments, where subvertical faults allow stress-induced electrical currents to flow rapidly to the surface. From the early days of seismology, the luminous phenomena associated with some earthquakes have intrigued scholars. Earthquake lights (EQL) appear before or during earthquakes, but rarely after.




Enormous earthquakes are missing from records   BBC - December 12, 2013
The Earth could have been struck by many more huge earthquakes in its recent history than was previously thought, scientists say. Research suggests that half of all quakes measuring more than 8.5 in magnitude that hit in the 19th Century are missing from records. Scientists are scanning historical documents for the lost tremors




Earthquake scars Earth's gravity   PhysOrg - December 4, 2013
ESA's GOCE satellite has revealed that the devastating Japanese earthquake of 2011 left its mark in Earth's gravity - yet another example of this extraordinary mission surpassing its original scope. GOCE mapped Earth's gravity with unrivaled precision for over four years, but nobody really expected the data to show changes over time. Now, careful analysis shows the effects of the 9.0 earthquake that struck east of Japan's Honshu Island on 11 March 2011 are clearly visible in GOCE's gravity data. Large earthquakes not only deform Earth's crust, but can also cause tiny changes in local gravity.




Seattle Football Fans Rock the House - and the Earth   Live Science - December 3, 2013
Rowdy fans stomping and roaring when the Seattle Seahawks scored a touchdown last night (Dec. 2) shook the football stadium so hard that a nearby seismometer registered an "earthquake." It's not the first time the seismometer, which monitors earthquakes, picked up ground-shaking vibrations from Seahawks fans. Nearly three years ago, on Jan. 8., 2011, a 67-yard touchdown run now known as the "Beast Quake" resulted in a fan frenzy as powerful as a magnitude-2 temblor. A 1988 showdown between Louisiana State University and Auburn University also registered on LSU's local seismometer, leading ESPN to dub it the "Earthquake Game."




Deadly New Zealand Earthquakes Weakened Earth's Crust   Live Science - November 25, 2013
A series of deadly earthquakes that shook New Zealand in 2010 and 2011 may have weakened a portion of Earth's crust, researchers say. New Zealand lies along the dangerous Ring of Fire - a narrow zone around the Pacific Ocean where about 90 percent of all the world's earthquakes, and 80 percent of the largest ones, strike. A devastating magnitude- 6.3 quake struck New Zealand's South Island in 2011. Centered very close to Christchurch, the country's second-largest city, it killed 185 people and damaged or destroyed 100,000 buildings. The earthquake was the costliest disaster to ever strike New Zealand, consuming about one-sixth of the country's gross domestic product.




Amazing Images of Pakistan's Earthquake Island   Live Science - October 1, 2013
A new island, now called Zalzala Koh, emerged offshore of the town of Gwadar in Pakistan after a powerful Sept. 24 earthquake. Likely a form of mud volcano, the island rose from the seafloor hours after the magnitude-7.7 earthquake struck about 380 kilometers (230 miles) inland.

How Did the Pakistan Earthquake Create a Mud Island?   National Geographic - September 26, 2013

On Tuesday, a 7.7-magnitude earthquake struck a remote part of western Pakistan, killing more than 260 people and displacing hundreds of thousands. It also triggered formation of a new island off the coast, which has quickly become a global curiosity. But scientists say the island won't last long. "It's a transient feature," said Bill Barnhart, a research geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey. "It will probably be gone within a couple of months. It's just a big pile of mud that was on the seafloor that got pushed up."

Pakistan earthquake creates new island, 'mud volcano' to blame   NBC - September 25, 2013

Mud houses in the mountains crumbled as a 7.7-magnitude earthquake shook western Pakistan early on Tuesday. Meanwhile, on the coast, residents of Gwadar saw a solitary island rise from the sea. Seismologists suspect the island is a temporary formation resulting from a "mud volcano," a jet of mud, sand and water that gushed to the surface as the temblor churned and pressurized that slurry under the ocean floor.




Norway's Weird Waves Traced to Japan Earthquake   Live Science - August 16, 2013
On a calm winter's day in Norway two years ago, the sea suddenly started to boil and rise, sending freak waves rolling onto nearby shores and mystifying residents. Turns out, the massive magnitude-9.0 earthquake that shook Japan in 2011 also triggered these surprise seiche waves, a new study shows.




Early Warning Signs of Injection-Well Earthquakes Found   Live Science - July 11, 2013
Two new studies of earthquakes near injection wells have seismologists using words rarely heard these days in earthquake science: prediction and warning. The research has also renewed calls for better seismic monitoring and reporting in regions experiencing man-made earthquakes. "Shale gas operations have completely changed our energy policy and people are injecting in places they've never injected before. If we're going to do this safely, we need to address the environmental issues, including protecting water supplies and earthquake risk.




Distant quakes 'can trigger wastewater-site temblors'   BBC - July 11, 2013
Earthquakes can be triggered at the sites of wastewater injection by quakes on the other side of the world, research suggests. The injection of wastewater from underground operations such as oil drilling is known to increase local seismic activity. Now a study in Science suggests that waves from the most distant temblors can cause quakes at wastewater sites.




Fracking and energy exploration connected to earthquakes, say studies   MSNBC - July 11, 2013
The rivers of water pumped into and out of the ground during the production of natural gas, oil and geothermal energy are causing the Earth to shake more frequently in areas where these industrial activities are soaring, according to a series of studies published today. While the gas extraction process known as hydraulic fracturing (aka "fracking") causes some small quakes, it's the disposal of wastewater following that process - and many others relating to energy production - that lead to the largest tremors.




Earthquakes Create Global-Scale GPS Errors   Live Science - May 23, 2013
Twelve years of supersized earthquakes have contaminated GPS sites around the world, a new study finds. The Global Positioning System is a network of satellites and ground stations that provide location information anywhere on Earth. Except for spots in Australia, western Europe and the eastern tip of Canada, every GPS site on the ground underwent small but important shifts since 2000 because of big earthquakes, according to a study published May 6 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth. The research confirms that great earthquakes, those bigger than magnitude 8.0, can have far-reaching effects on the Earth's crust. And because GPS is critical for everything from calculating satellite orbits to sea level rise to earthquake hazards, scientists can't ignore these tiny zigs and zags, the researchers conclude.




Amid wreckage of China quake, the desperate search for survivors   CNN - April 22, 2013

Families badly in need of food and water are living in makeshift shelters near the shattered remains of their houses in this area of the southwestern Chinese province of Sichuan where a strong earthquake struck over the weekend, killing at least 188 people.

Images from CNN   April 20, 2013




What Caused The Deadly China Earthquake?   Live Science - April 22, 2013
The strong earthquake that struck China's Sichuan province at 8:47 a.m. local time Saturday (April 20) probably hit along the same fault as the region's devastating 2008 earthquake, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The epicenter of the magnitude-6.6 earthquake was likely on the Longmen Shan Fault, the USGS said in a report on the April 20 quake. It was centered at a relatively shallow 7.6 miles (12.3 kilometers) below the surface, similar to the 2008 temblor. The 2008 earthquake, a magnitude 7.9, killed more than 69,000 people and released 89 times more energy than yesterday's earthquake. The Longmen Shan Fault is actually a zone of tectonically-related thrust faults that mark the boundary between the high Tibetan Plateau and the Sichuan Basin lowlands. With each earthquake, a fault thrusts the plateau over the basin, shortening the distance between the two regions. The fault zone stretches more than 150 miles (240 km) along the base of the Longmen Shan Mountains. The mountain front is known for its amazingly steep rise - from 2,000 feet (600 meters) elevation in the basin to 21,325 feet (6,500 m) in the mountains, all in just 30 miles (50 km).

2013 Lushan earthquake   Wikipedia




Breaking the Ice: Earthquakes Trigger Antarctic 'Icequakes'   Live Science - April 22, 2013
When the world shakes, so does Antarctica's ice, according to a study presented here April 19 at the Seismological Society of America's annual meeting. Icequakes are vibrations in glaciers and ice sheets (the massive expanses of glacial ice that cover Antarctica and Greenland). From small creaks and groans to sudden slips equal to a magnitude-7 earthquake, the shaking signals movement in the ice. Scientists discovered that big earthquakes, including Japan's 2011 Tohoku quake and Chile's 2010 Maule temblor, set off icequakes across Antarctica, just as they triggered earthquakes on land.




  7.0 quake hits ocean off Japan, Russia; no damage   AP - April 19, 2013
The Japan Meteorological Agency said sea changes were possible. No tsunami warnings have been issued. The tremor struck around midday in the Pacific Ocean at a relatively shallow depth of 10 kilometers (6.2 miles). The U.S. Geological Survey measured a stronger 7.2 magnitude. Japan and Russia both claim some of the sparsely populated islands in the remote region.




6.0-Magnitude Earthquake Strikes Off Kuril Islands   Live Science - April 19, 2013
Earthquakes of this size are considered major and can cause significant damage, especially with poorly built structures. Even well designed buildings can be damaged or, in some cases, destroyed depending on the severity of the quake and a building's proximity to the epicenter. Earthquakes of this size are sometimes followed by significant aftershocks.




Mine Disaster - Earthquakes Shed New Light on Utah Collapse   Live Science - April 19, 2013
One of Utah's deadliest mine disasters may have brought down the entire Crandall Canyon coal mine, according to a new seismic study presented today (April 19) at the Seismological Society of America's annual meeting in Salt Lake City. At Crandall Canyon, a room carved from coal collapsed 1,500 feet (457 meters) below the surface on Aug. 6, 2007, trapping six workers. A tunnel collapse on Aug. 16 killed three rescuers digging toward the suspected location of the miners. The bodies of the six miners were never recovered. With new analysis techniques, researchers at the University of Utah identified up to 2,000 tiny, previously unrecognized earthquakes before, during and after the coal mine collapse.




Earthquakes Are East Coast's Biggest Tsunami Threat   Live Science - April 19, 2013
The U.S. East Coast's biggest tsunami threat lurks just offshore, according to research presented today (April 19) at the Seismological Society of America's annual meeting in Salt Lake City. Recent earthquake swarms off the Massachusetts coast highlight the threat of tsunamis from nearby earthquakes, rather than faraway islands, said John Ebel, a seismologist at Boston College. The geologic setting of the quakes off the Northeast appears similar to that of a magnitude-7.3 earthquake that struck in the Grand Banks off Newfoundland in 1929, Ebel said. The resulting 32-foot (10 meters) tsunami swamped southern Newfoundland and triggered underwater landslides that severed transatlantic telephone cables.




Hurricane Sandy lit up seismometers across US   MSNBC - April 20, 2013
Hurricane Sandy's fateful left turn toward the mid-Atlantic Coast in October last year lit up earthquake monitors all the way to Seattle, according to results presented at the Seismological Society of America's annual meeting Thursday. When Hurricane Sandy veered on Oct. 29, the sudden increase in crashing ocean waves sent rumbles through the Earth detectable on seismometers. The wave-on-wave collisions created what are called standing waves, doubling the energy directed at the seafloor, scientists reported today. The ocean gave the seafloor a little shove, sending seismic waves through the Earth.




Superstorm Sandy Shook the U.S., Literally   Science Daily - April 18, 2013
When superstorm Sandy turned and took aim at New York City and Long Island last October, ocean waves hitting each other and the shore rattled the seafloor and much of the United States -- shaking detected by seismometers across the country, University of Utah researchers found.




Quite a Jolt: Earthquakes Heralded Opening of Sinkhole   Live Science - April 17, 2013
Earthquakes signaled the opening of a giant toxic sinkhole in southeastern Louisiana last year, researchers reported here today at the Seismological Society of America's annual meeting. Strong shaking first rattled residents of Bayou Corne on June 8 and July 3 in 2012, prompting officials to install earthquake monitors near the small town. After July 14, seismometers detected 10 to 12 sharp tremors of about magnitude 2.5 jolting the region daily, said Steve Horton, a seismologist at the University of Memphis and lead study author.




Salt Lake City Could See Bigger Earthquakes   Live Science - April 17, 2013
Two faults bounding Utah's biggest city may combine to produce especially powerful earthquakes, geologists will report in Salt Lake City today (April 17) at the annual meeting of the Seismological Society of America. Utah's biggest earthquake fault runs east of Salt Lake City, at the base of the steep Wasatch Mountains. About 75 percent of the state's population lives near the 240-mile-long (385 kilometers) Wasatch Fault, according to the Utah Geological Survey. Its last big earthquake hit in 1600, 247 years before Mormon settlers arrived.




  Major earthquake strikes south-east Iran   BBC - April 16, 2013

Iran has been struck by its most powerful earthquake for nearly 40 years, with tremors felt across Pakistan, India and the Middle East. The epicentre of the 7.8 magnitude quake was near the south-east city of Khash, close to the Pakistani border, the US Geological Survey said. Offices were evacuated in Abu Dhabi and buildings swayed in Delhi, India.




What Caused Iran's 6.3 Deadly Earthquake?   Live Science - April 9, 2013
Crashing continents caused today's deadly earthquake in Iran, which killed dozens. The magnitude-6.3 Iran earthquake hit in the southern Zagros Mountains, a stunning range that marks the boundary between the Arabian and Eurasian tectonic plates. The Arabian plate is grinding northward at about 0.4 inches (10 millimeters) a year, pushing the boot-shaped Arabian peninsula into the Eurasian plate, which covers most of Europe and Asia.




Series of earthquakes shakes Oklahoma   MSNBC - April 16, 2013
A magnitude-4.3 earthquake shook Oklahoma early Tuesday, the United States Geological Survey reported. The quake struck at 12:56 a.m. local time (1:56 a.m. ET) around 30 miles northeast of Oklahoma City. It was measured at a depth of 3.1 miles, the USGS said.




What Caused Iran's 6.3 Deadly Earthquake?   Live Science - April 9, 2013
Crashing continents caused today's deadly earthquake in Iran, which killed dozens. The magnitude-6.3 Iran earthquake hit in the southern Zagros Mountains, a stunning range that marks the boundary between the Arabian and Eurasian tectonic plates. The Arabian plate is grinding northward at about 0.4 inches (10 millimeters) a year, pushing the boot-shaped Arabian peninsula into the Eurasian plate, which covers most of Europe and Asia.




Japan quake 'heard at edge of space'   BBC - March 10, 2013
The great Tohoku earthquake in Japan two years ago was so big its effects were even felt at the edge of space. Scientists say the Magnitude 9.0 tremor on 11 March 2011 sent a ripple of sound through the atmosphere that was picked up by the Goce satellite. Its super-sensitive instrumentation was able to detect the disturbance as it passed through the thin wisps of air still present 255km above the Earth.




6.3-Magnitude Earthquake Strikes Off California   Live Science - December 14, 2012
The earthquake originated 7 miles (11.3 km) deep and struck at 2:36 a.m. local time. The temblor's epicenter was 172 miles (277 km) southwest of Coronado, Calif., (just outside of downtown San Diego) and 163 miles (263 km) south-southwest of Santa Catalina Island - also hitting Newport Beach, Santa Ana, Temecula and Long Beach. Though Southern California experiences frequent earthquakes along the San Andreas and associated faults, the spot where today's quake struck has not seen any temblors greater than magnitude 6.0 in the past 40 years, according to the USGS. No tsunami warning was immediately issued. There also were no reports of damage or injuries on the mainland.




2012 Haida Gwaii Earthquake   Wikipedia
The 2012 Haida Gwaii earthquake was a 7.8 Mw, earthquake that occurred just after 8:04 p.m. PDT on October 27, 2012. This was the second largest Canadian earthquake ever recorded by a seismometer, after the 1949 Queen Charlotte Islands earthquake, about 135 kilometres (84 mi) away. A tsunami warning was issued for the North American Coast from the Alaskan Panhandle to Vancouver Island, but later limited to the North Coast region of British Columbia. There were 94 aftershocks of magnitude 4.0 or greater lasting until November 7, as recorded by the USGS.




Huge Earthquake Triggered Other Quakes Worldwide   Live Science - September 27, 2012
On April 11, a massive magnitude 8.6 earthquake shook the floor of the Indian Ocean off Sumatra. It wasn't just unusual because of its size - the 10th largest quake in the last century - it also set off a series of quakes around the world for up to six days afterward, according to a study published today (Sept. 26) in the journal Nature. "Until now, we seismologists have always said, 'Don't worry about distant earthquakes triggering local quakes,'" said Roland Burgmann, an earth and planetary scientist at UC Berkeley, in a statement. "This study now says that, while it is very rare - it may only happen every few decades - it is a real possibility if the right kind of earthquake happens." The study found that some quakes were triggered within a few hours, while in other places the seismic waves from the Sumatran quake primed temblors to happen for up to six days later.




Weird 2012 Quake Signals Tectonic Plate Birth   Live Science - September 27, 2012
On the afternoon of April 11, 2012, one of the most powerful earthquakes ever recorded - and now revealed to be among the weirdest - struck in the Indian Ocean, off the coast of Sumatra. It's a region all too familiar with geological catastrophe. Eight years earlier, in December 2004, the third largest earthquake on record had ripped through a nearby region of the ocean floor. The magnitude-9.1 earthquake and the monstrous tsunami that soon followed killed more than 227,000 people in 14 countries, So when a magnitude-8.7 earthquake (some put the magnitude at 8.6) shook the Indonesian island on that Wednesday afternoon earlier this year, many expected the worst. Yet, no monster wave appeared. A wave did come ashore, but it was a miniature tsunami, just 12 inches (31 centimeters) high.




April Sumatra quakes signal Indian ocean plate break-up   BBC - September 27, 2012
The sequence of huge earthquakes that struck off the coast of Sumatra in April may signal the creation of a new tectonic plate boundary. They say their analysis of the tremors - the biggest was a magnitude 8.7 - suggests major changes are taking place on the ocean floor that will eventually split the Indo-Australian plate in two.

Italian Seismologists Could Get Four Years in Prison   Live Science - September 27, 2012
Six Italian scientists and one government official could see four-year prison terms for manslaughter for allegedly downplaying the risk of an earthquake in the town of L'Aquila, Italy, in 2009.




Watch how Costa Rica quake vibrations rattled beneath US   MSNBC - September 5, 2012
A new animation shows the shockwave from the 7.6 magnitude earthquake that struck Costa Rica Wednesday morning arriving and reverberating through the ground beneath the United States. The visualization was made by scientists at Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) and shows the Earth slowly moving up and down. Red spots show seismometers moving upward; the darker the hue, the higher they are moving up. The opposite goes for blue. The visualization shows how earthquakes create waves of motion through the Earth's crust, just as a pebble tossed into a pond creates a ripple. "But in this case, the pond is North America," said John Taber, head of outreach for IRIS.




  Watch Costa Rica Quake Vibrations Hit US   Live Science - September 6, 2012
A new animation shows the shockwave from the 7.6 magnitude earthquake that struck Costa Rica this morning (Sept. 5) arriving and reverberating through the ground beneath the United States. The visualization was made by scientists at Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) and shows the Earth slowly moving up and down. Red spots show seismometers moving upward; the darker the hue, the higher they are moving up. The opposite goes for blue. The visualization shows how earthquakes create waves of motion through the Earth's crust, just as a pebble tossed into a pond creates a ripple.




Earthquakes Reveal Magma Plumbing Beneath Volcanoes   Live Science - July 20, 2012
A helicopter battled near-hurricane-force winds as a team of seismologists fought its way through a treacherous mountain pass to reach the Alaska Peninsula's Katmai area. Their goal: to install a network of seismometers around the Katmai Volcanoes, the source of the largest volcanic eruption since Indonesia's Mount Tambora in 1815. Four years and mounds of data later, the team is beginning to understand the plumbing system beneath that group of volcanoes, including the magma source for the 1912 Novarupta eruption, which spewed 3 cubic miles (12 cubic kilometers) of magma and dwarfed the 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption 30 times over.




  Stunning Map Reveals World's Earthquakes Since 1898   Live Science - June 29, 2012

If you've ever wondered where - and why - earthquakes happen the most, look no further than a new map, which plots more than a century's worth of nearly every recorded earthquake strong enough to at least rattle the bookshelves. The map shows earthquakes of magnitude 4.0 or greater since 1898; each is marked in a lightning-bug hue that glows brighter with increasing magnitude.




Are 4 Big Earthquakes in 2 Days Connected?   Live Science - April 12, 2012
The 8.6-magnitude earthquake that hit off the coast of Sumatra, Indonesia, yesterday (April 11) was followed by several decent-size shakes along the west coast of North America, but researchers can't say for certain whether all the temblors were related.




New Madrid Fault 200 Years Later


December 16, 1811 - February 7, 1812: New Madrid Fault Earthquakes   Wikipedia






Japan Quake Lifted Seabed 16 Stories - Largest Recorded   National Geographic - December 1, 2011
Japan's devastating March 11 earthquake shifted the seabed by as much as 165 feet (50 meters) - the largest slip yet recorded, a new study says. That's considerably larger than in previous reports, which in May put the shift at 79 feet (24 meters).




Oregon: New massive fault line found on Mount Hood   MSNBC - August 30, 2011
Geologists think Mount Hood is sitting on shaky ground. The Oregonian first reported that scientists have discovered a previously undetected - and active - fault zone on the mountain. Scientists said the faults could also prove dangerous. The fault zone stretches about 20 miles from the northern flank of Mount Hood to the Columbia River. Hidden by trees and dense vegetation, it had gone unnoticed. Oregon state scientists discovered the fault line using aircraft equipped with LIDAR - a high-tech laser scanning mapping system. Oregon State Department of Geology Chief Scientist Ian Mayden helped map out the faults and believes they likely make up one massive fault that at one point in history ruptured, causing the earth to break apart some six feet.




7.1 magnitude earthquake strikes off Alaska   MSNBC - September 2, 2011
A 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck Friday in the Aleutian Islands off Alaska, the U.S. Geological Survey reported, prompting a brief tsunami warning for a portion of Alaska's coast. The U.S. Geological Survey said the earthquake struck in the waters at about 6:55 a.m. ET. There were no reports of injuries or damage, according to Alaska's KTUU.com.




New Hidden Quake Fault Found in California   Live Science - June 16, 2011
Scientists with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers were inspecting the Martis Creek Dam, which sits just outside Truckee, Calif., and about 35 miles upstream from Reno. It is one of 10 dams in the United States that has urgent and compelling safety concerns, according to the Corps, which owns the dam. Data from the most recent evaluation revealed that, not only does the dam have significant leakage, it also lies in close proximity to not two, but three fault zones.




Scientists find odd twist in slow 'earthquakes': Tremor running backwards   PhysOrg - May 23, 2011
Earthquake scientists trying to unravel the mysteries of an unfelt, weeks-long seismic phenomenon called episodic tremor and slip have discovered a strange twist. The tremor can suddenly reverse direction and travel back through areas of the fault that it had ruptured in preceding days, and do so 20 to 40 times faster than the original fault rupture.





2011 Sendai Earthquake and Tsunami




Scientists find increase in microearthquakes after Chilean quake   PhysOrg - February 25, 2011
By studying seismographs from the earthquake that hit Chile last February, earth scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have found a statistically significant increase of micro-earthquakes in central California in the first few hours after the main shock. The observation provides an additional support that seismic waves from distant earthquakes could also trigger seismic events on the other side of the earth. The results may be found online in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.


Indonesia Earthquake, Tsunami, Mt. Merapi Erupts


October 2010 Sumatra Earthquake and Tsunami   Wikipedia

The country's most volatile volcano, Mount Merapi,
800 miles (1,300 kilometers) to the east, erupted.

Both events fell along Indonesia's portion of the Pacific Ring of Fire, a
series of fault lines that are prone to earthquakes and volcanic activity
stretching from the Western Hemisphere through Japan and Southeast Asia.



Photos: Merapi Volcano Ash Smothers Indonesian Villages
 
National Geographic - October 29, 2010


Indonesia's Explosive Geology Explained   Live Science - October 26, 2010
Indonesia is a dangerous country to call home. Precariously located above the grinding and mashing of several tectonic plates, and ringed by a chain of fire-breathing volcanoes, the country's islands are located in one of the most volatile regions in the world. The eruption of a volcano and the shaking of a tsunami-generating earthquake this week is just one reminder of Indonesia's fiery foundation.





Big quakes more frequent than thought on San Andreas fault   PhysOrg - August 21, 2010
Earthquakes have rocked the powerful San Andreas fault that splits California far more often than previously thought, according to UC Irvine and Arizona State University researchers who have charted temblors there stretching back 700 years. The dreaded "Big One" could be just around the corner.




Earthquake Moved California City 31 Inches   Live Science - June 24, 2010
Quake physically moved Calexico 2.5 feet south   MSNBC - June 24, 2010




Odds 1-in-3 for Northwest Mega-Quake Within 50 Years   Live Science - May 24, 2010
A major earthquake, similar to what devastated Chile and Haiti, has more than a one-in-three chance of striking the U.S. Pacific Northwest within the next 50 years, scientists say. Earlier estimates put the chance of such quakes at just once every 500 years. But new analyses by Oregon State University marine geologist Chris Goldfinger and his colleagues have revealed a more complex picture of the Cascadia Subduction zone, where the ocean floor steadily slips below the North American Plate - and where the region's earthquakes originate. They found that Cascadia represents at least four separate segments, rather than one big subduction zone. Mega-quakes of magnitude-9 or greater occur less frequently in the northern segment and can rupture the entire fault, even as magnitude-8 earthquakes strike more often in the southern segment.




April 4, 2010 Baja California 7.2 earthquake   Wikipedia

The 2010 Baja California earthquake (also known as 2010 Easter earthquake, 2010 Sierra El Mayor earthquake, or 2010 El Mayor - Cucapah earthquake) was an earthquake of 7.2 magnitude on the moment magnitude scale. It started 26 kilometers (16 mi) south of Guadalupe Victoria, Baja California, Mexico, at a depth of 10 km (6.2 mi).[3] It occurred at 3:40:41 pm Pacific Daylight Time (PDT) (22:40:41 UTC) on Easter Sunday, April 4, 2010, and it is said to have lasted about a minute and a half. The strongest shaking was felt in the ejido of Alberto Oviedo Mota, municipality of Mexicali, at Mercalli intensity scale VIII (Severe). In Mexicali, Calexico and Guadalupe Victoria it rated VII (Very Strong), while in Ensenada and Tijuana it measured VI (Strong). Most of the damage in this earthquake occurred in the twin cities of Mexicali and Calexico on the Mexico-United States border. Four people were killed and 100 people were injured.

The quake was widely felt throughout the Western United States, and some Southern zones, and Northwest Mexico. The earthquake was the strongest to rock Southern California in at least 18 years (since the 1992 Landers earthquake (M 7.3)), if not longer: the next most recent comparable earthquake - the 1952 Kern County earthquake (M 7.3) - 58 years earlier. Each of these earthquakes had similar magnitudes, and were also felt across a large swath of North America.




Thousands of Quakes Strike Glaciers Every Day   Live Science - April 3, 2010
Up to thousands of "icequakes" may shake a glacier a day, rumblings that could shed light on how climate is changing. Just as volcanoes involve magma interacting with rock, so too do glaciers often involve interplays between water and ice. As such, giant events within glaciers can occur, with icequakes in Antarctica known to reach the force of a magnitude 7 earthquake. To learn more about icequakes, scientists in Alaska used equipment and techniques normally employed for monitoring seismic events to investigate the Bering Glacier, which flows from the St. Elias mountain range to the south-central coast of Alaska. Ice in this temperate glacier is near its melting point, leading to a history of dramatic surges.




Toads can 'predict earthquakes' and seismic activity   BBC - March 31, 2010
Common toads appear to be able to sense an impending earthquake and will flee their colony days before the seismic activity strikes. The evidence comes from a population of toads which left their breeding colony three days before an earthquake that struck L'Aquila in Italy in 2009. How toads sensed the quake is unclear, but most breeding pairs and males fled. They reacted despite the colony being 74km from the quake's epicentre, say biologists in the Journal of Zoology. It is hard to objectively and quantifiably study how animals respond to seismic activity, in part because earthquakes are rare and unpredictable. Some studies have been done on how domestic animals respond, but measuring the response of wild animals is more difficult.




Quake Moved Chilean City 10 Feet   Live Science - March 9, 2010

The massive 8.8 magnitude earthquake that struck Chile more than a week ago moved the city of Concepción at least 10 feet (3 meters) to the west, seismological measurements indicate. The violent temblor the fifth most powerful quake ever measured shifted other parts of South America as well, from the Falkland Islands (located just east of the southern tip of South America) to Fortaleza, Brazil, situated on that country's northern coast. The quake occurred off the coast of the Maule region of Chile in one of Earth's seismic hotspots where the Nazca tectonic plate is squeezed under, or subducted below, the neighboring South American plate. Tension builds up as the plates move against each other, and earthquakes such as the one that struck Chile on Feb. 27 relieve these pent-up stresses.




Researchers show how far South American cities moved in quake   PhysOrg - March 8, 2010
The massive magnitude 8.8 earthquake that struck the west coast of Chile last month moved the entire city of Concepcion at least 10 feet to the west, and shifted other parts of South America as far apart as the Falkland Islands and Fortaleza, Brazil.




A Disastrous Year: 2010 Death Toll Already Abnormally High   Live Science - March 11, 2010
Just a few months into 2010, and Mother Nature has delivered a slew of costly and deadly natural disasters. From the catastrophic Haiti and Chilean earthquakes to the U.S. blizzard that descended on Washington, D.C., last month, which was mostly just inconvenient by comparison, 2010 is already above average in terms of natural-disaster casualties. In comparison to previous years, the number of casualties from natural disasters in 2010, which is already well above 200,000, is outside the norm. Yet as in other disastrous years, the high toll this year is due largely to a single event. Over the decade from 2000 to the end of 2009, the yearly average was 78,000, according to the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (ISDR). For the 1990s, the average was 43,000, and the 1980s was 75,000. Disaster experts say the rise in tragedy is at least partly due to increases in urban populations.




Chile

Why the Chile Earthquake Aftershock Was So Big   Live Science - March 11, 2010
The whopping 7.2-magnitude aftershock that rattled Chile again today is nothing unusual following such a large original earthquake, scientists say. The aftershock, which struck at about 11:40 am local time, may sound surprisingly strong, given that it is bigger than the original earthquake that decimated Haiti in January, but it wasn't unexpected to scientists, said Don Blakeman, a geophysicist with the United States Geological Survey. The 8.8-magnitude earthquake that struck off the coast of the Maule region of Chile on Feb. 27 was one of the strongest ever recorded. After such a strong quake, aftershocks that are themselves substantial are par for the course.


Chile Earthquake Altered Earth Axis, Shortened Day   National Geographic - March 2, 2010

Saturday's Chile earthquake was so powerful that it likely shifted an Earth axis and shortened the length of a day, NASA announced Monday. By speeding up Earth's rotation, the magnitude 8.8 earthquake the fifth strongest ever recorded, according to the USGS should have shortened an Earth day by 1.26 millionths of a second, according to new computer-model calculations by geophysicist Richard Gross of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. For comparison, the same model estimated that the magnitude 9 Sumatra earthquake in December 2004 shortened the length of a day by 6.8 millionths of a second.


February 26, 2010 Chile Earthquake   Wikipedia




  Istanbul: A Megacity Girds for a Major Quake   New York Times - February 25, 2010




7.0 Earthquake in Haiti Wikipedia - January 12, 2010

The 2010 Haiti earthquake was a catastrophic magnitude 7.0 Mw earthquake, with an epicenter near the town of Leogane (Ouest Department), approximately 25 km (16 miles) west of Port-au-Prince, Haiti's capital. The earthquake occurred at 16:53 local time (21:53 UTC) on Tuesday, 12 January 2010. By 24 January, at least 52 aftershocks measuring 4.5 or greater had been recorded.[9] An estimated three million people were affected by the quake. Death toll estimates range from 100,000 [6] to 159,000 [5] to Haitian government figures from 220,000 to 316,000 that have been widely characterized as deliberately inflated by the Haitian government. The government of Haiti estimated that 250,000 residences and 30,000 commercial buildings had collapsed or were severely damaged.

The earthquake caused major damage in Port-au-Prince, Jacmel and other settlements in the region. Many notable landmark buildings were significantly damaged or destroyed, including the Presidential Palace, the National Assembly building, the Port-au-Prince Cathedral, and the main jail. Among those killed were Archbishop of Port-au-Prince Joseph Serge Miot, and opposition leader Micha Gaillard. The headquarters of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH), located in the capital, collapsed, killing many, including the Mission's Chief, Hedi Annabi.


Haiti quake: The worst of places for a big tremor   BBC - January 13, 2010

It was immediately obvious that Tuesday's quake in Haiti would be an appalling natural disaster. This was a large tremor centred on an impoverished country with little recent experience or preparedness for such an event. The buildings in the quake zones of major industrialised nations sit on damping systems that allow them to ride out tremors that not only shake them back and forth but also twist them in the same movement. The simplest concrete structures in the capital of Port-au-Prince will have crumpled under the same strain. Seismometers recorded a preliminary magnitude of 7.0 at 1653 local time (2153 GMT). The epicentre's proximity to Port-au-Prince - 15km (10 miles) - and the focus (or depth) of just 8km (5 miles) will have ensured the destructive forces were at their most intense.




Tremors Between Slip Events: More Evidence of Great Quake Danger to Seattle   Science Daily - December 16, 2009

For most of a decade, scientists have documented unfelt and slow-moving seismic events, called episodic tremor and slip, showing up in regular cycles under the Olympic Peninsula of Washington state and Vancouver Island in British Columbia. They last three weeks on average and release as much energy as a magnitude 6.5 earthquake.

Little California tsunami risk from British Columbia 6.6 earthquake   LA Times - November 18, 2009

Study: Megaquake looms over Seattle   MSNBC - October 28, 2009

Researchers say fault goes deeper than thought and heads toward city




Earthquakes actually aftershocks of 19th century quakes   PhysOrg - November 4, 2009




The major 2004 earthquake in Sumatra may have weakened the San Andreas fault   BBC - October 1, 2009




September 2009 Sumatra earthquake  Wikipedia
he September 2009 Sumatra earthquake occurred just off the southern coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. The major shock hit at 17:16:10 local time on September 30, 2009 (10:16:10 UTC) and had a moment magnitude of 7.9.[3][4] The epicenter was 45 kilometres (28 mi) west-northwest of Padang, Sumatra, and 220 kilometres (140 mi) southwest of Pekanbaru, Sumatra. Early death-toll estimates extended beyond 1300. Government reports have to date confirmed 1,115 dead, 1,214 severely injured and 1,688 slightly injured. The most deaths occurred in the areas of Padang Pariaman (675), Padang (313), Agam (80) and Pariaman (37). In addition, around 135,000 houses were severely damaged, 65,000 houses were moderately damaged and 79,000 houses were slightly damaged. An estimated 250,000 families (1,250,000 people) have been affected by the earthquake through the total or partial loss of their homes and livelihoods.




2009 Samoa Earthquake  Wikipedia

The 2009 Samoa earthquake was an 8.1 Mw submarine earthquake that took place in the Samoan Islands region at 06:48:11 local time on 29 September 2009 (17:48:11 UTC, 29 September). At a magnitude of 8.1, it was the largest earthquake of 2009. A tsunami was generated which caused substantial damage and loss of life in Samoa, American Samoa, and Tonga. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center recorded a 3-inch (76 mm) rise in sea levels near the epicenter, and New Zealand scientists determined that the waves measured 14 metres (46 ft) at their highest on the Samoan coast. The quake occurred on the outer rise of the Kermadec-Tonga Subduction Zone. This is part of the Pacific Ring of Fire, where tectonic plates in the Earth's lithosphere meet and earthquakes and volcanic activity are common.

Countries affected by the tsunami in the areas that were hit are American Samoa, Samoa and Tonga (Niuatoputapu) where more than 189 people were killed, especially children, most of them in Samoa. Large waves with no major damage were reported on the coasts of Fiji, the northern coast of New Zealand and Rarotonga in the Cook Islands. People took precautions in the low-lying atolls of Tokelau and moved to higher ground. Niue was reported as reasonably safe because it is high. There were no reports of high waves from Vanuatu, Kiribati, New Caledonia and the Solomon Islands.




New Fault Raises Threat of Eastern Earthquakes   Live Science - January 22, 2009
A newfound earthquake fault in Arkansas could eventually be the site of a major earthquake that would rock much of the south and east, according to news reports. A major gas pipeline is said to be near the fault and at risk. The alarm bell is similar to many sounded in recent years. In August, scientists said the New York City area is at "substantially greater" risk of earthquakes than previously thought. The Indian Point nuclear power plants, 24 miles north of the city, sits astride the previously unidentified intersection of two active seismic zones, the researchers noted. In general, geologists warn that large earthquakes are rare East of the Rocky Mountains, but they do occur and are bound to prove devastating.

Arkansas: New Fault Could Cause "Major Disaster"   National Geographic - January 23, 2009

Arkansas: New fault could lead to magnitude 7 earthquake with epicenter near major natural gas pipeline   PhysOrg - January 22, 2009




Quake Swarm Hits Yellowstone; Something Bigger to Come?   National Geographic - December 30, 2008
Yellowstone National Park was jostled by a host of small earthquakes for a third straight day Monday, and scientists watched closely to see whether the more than 250 tremors were a sign of something bigger to come. Swarms of small earthquakes happen frequently in Yellowstone, located in Wyoming in the western U.S., but it's very unusual for so many earthquakes to happen over several days, said Robert Smith, a professor of geophysics at the University of Utah.




Deadly San Andreas Fault Longer Than Thought National Geographic - July 31, 2008

If the tremor that struck California earlier this week was not enough of a reminder of the region's dangerous side, a new study says the powerful San Andreas Fault extends further south than previously believed. Tuesday's magnitude 5.4 quake in greater Los Angeles occurred along one of many lesser known fault lines that fan out from the San Andreas like glass fractures.




China May 2008
2008 Sichuan earthquake Wikipedia

The 2008 Sichuan earthquake or the Great Sichuan Earthquake was a deadly earthquake that measured at 8.0 Ms and 7.9 Mw, and occurred at 02:28:01 PM China Standard Time at epicenter (06:28:01 UTC) on Monday, May 12, 2008 in Sichuan province, killing 69,195 people, with 18,392 missing.


China Quake Delivered Seismic One-Two Punch National Geographic - May 16, 2008
The fault line that caused this week's devastating earthquake in China probably buckled in two stages.


Did Pandas Sensed China Quake Coming? National Geographic - May 16, 2008




Mysterious "Swarm" of Quakes Strikes Oregon Waters National Geographic - April 16, 2008

This weekend scientists will take to the water to try to puzzle out the cause of a "swarm" of mysterious earthquakes that has shaken the seafloor near Oregon in recent weeks. About 600 earthquakes have been recorded in a small region about 190 nautical miles (350 kilometers) offshore from Yachats, said Robert Dziak, a geophysicist with Oregon State University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Newport, Oregon.




April 18, 2008 Illinois 5.2 earthquake Wikipedia

The 2008 Illinois earthquake was one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded in the state of Illinois, measuring a magnitude of 5.4. It occurred at 4:37:00am CDT (9:37:00 UTC) on April 18 within the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone at a depth of 11.6 km. It was centered near West Salem, Illinois and Mount Carmel, Illinois (the affected area is west of Terre Haute, Indiana and Vincennes, Indiana; east of St. Louis, Missouri; and northwest of Evansville, Indiana), specifically 38.450°N, 87.890°W,[3] and felt as far as 450 miles (724 km) away.

Tremors were felt as far west as Nebraska and Kansas City, as far south as Atlanta, as far east as Kitchener, Ontario and West Virginia, and as far north as the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The earthquake was felt so far away, compared to earthquakes in other regions, because the old, rigid bedrock beneath much of the Midwest allows the tremor to propagate further. The earthquake epicenter was located in the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone, which is adjacent to the more famous New Madrid Seismic Zone.




How The Eruption of Thera Changed the World Live Science - February 26, 2008

The world map might look differently had the Greek volcano Thera not erupted 3,500 years ago in what geologists believe was the single-most powerful explosive event ever witnessed. Thera didn't just blow a massive hole into the island of Santorini - it set the entire ancient Mediterranean onto a different course, like a train that switched tracks to head off in a brand new direction.

Santorini ~ Thera ~ Atlantis Wikipedia




Biggest earthquake in UK for nearly 25 BBC - February 27, 2008
The biggest earthquake in the UK for nearly 25 years has shaken homes across large parts of the country. People in Newcastle, Yorkshire, London, Cumbria, the Midlands, Norfolk and also parts of Wales, felt the tremor just before 0100 GMT.




Indonesia Fault Line Quakes Nearly 20 Times This Month National Geographic - February 26, 2008
The fault line that spawned the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami has ruptured nearly 20 times this month, causing three strong earthquakes. The activity shows the stress the seam is under and could be a harbinger of worse to come, scientists warn.




Supercomputer Unleashes Virtual 9.0 Megaquake in Pacific Northwest PhysOrg - February 26, 2008
On January 26, 1700, at about 9 p.m. local time, the Juan de Fuca plate beneath the ocean in the Pacific Northwest suddenly moved, slipping some 60 feet eastward beneath the North American plate in a monster quake of approximately magnitude 9, setting in motion large tsunamis that struck the coast of North America and traveled to the shores of Japan. Since then, the earth beneath the region - which includes the cities of Vancouver, Seattle and Portland - has been relatively quiet. But scientists believe that earthquakes with magnitudes greater than 8, so-called "megathrust events," occur along this fault on average every 400 to 500 years. To help prepare for the next megathrust earthquake, a team of researchers led by seismologist Kim Olsen of San Diego State University (SDSU) used a supercomputer-powered virtual earthquake program to calculate for the first time realistic three-dimensional simulations that describe the possible impacts of megathrust quakes on the Pacific Northwest region. Also participating in the study were researchers from the San Diego Supercomputer Center at UC San Diego and the U.S. Geological Survey.




Sumatra Earthquakes and Tsunami Wikipedia - September 12, 2007

The September 2007 Sumatra earthquakes were a series of megathrust earthquakes that struck the Sunda Trench off the coast of Sumatra, Indonesia, three greater than magnitude 7. A series of tsunami bulletins was issued for the area. The most powerful of the series had a magnitude of 8.5, which makes it in the top 20 of the largest earthquakes ever recorded on a seismograph.




8.0 earthquake in Peru Wikipedia - August 16, 2007

The 2007 Peru earthquake was an earthquake measuring 8.0 on the moment magnitude scale that hit the central coast of Peru on Wednesday, August 15, 2007; it occurred at 23:40:57 UTC (18:40:57 local time) and lasted for about three minutes. The epicenter was located 150 km (93 mi) south-southeast of Lima at a depth of 39 km (24 mi). The United States Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center reported that it was a very strong earthquake. The Peruvian government stated that 519 people were killed by the quake.




Mexico: In Surprise, Major Earthquake Fault Slips Backward Live Science - August 2, 2007

A vast chunk of Earth sliding under Mexico has surprisingly reversed direction, puzzling geologists and leaving them wondering whether the ground might be poised to pummel Mexico City with a devastating earthquake. The offshore tectonic plate had been sliding toward Mexico City at a rate of 1 inch per year, as recorded by Global Positioning System measuring stations near Acapulco and Guerrero, which is about 175 miles southwest of Mexico City. That movement was normal, as predicted by theories of how Earth's crustal plates should move. At subduction zones, like this one, an oceanic plate typically slides beneath a continental plate, and now and then major temblors occur.




Mystery tremors bring new twist to quake prediction Guardian - March 15, 2007
Weak "non-volcanic tremors", first discovered five years ago near Shikoku in Japan, pose no dangers in themselves and have previously been dismissed as insignificant by many scientists. But a new study shows that they are related to low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs), slow-moving seismic activity deep underground which can potentially build up enough force over time to cause a major earthquake at the surface.




Rare 6.0 Earthquake Shakes Gulf of Mexico on Sunday National Geographic - September 12, 2006
...strongest earthquake to hit the Gulf of Mexico in 33 years




Rain compounds Java quake misery after 6.3 Quake in Indonesia BBC - May 29, 2006
Survivors of an earthquake that killed at least 4,900 people on Indonesia's island of Java have spent a second night outdoors. Driving rain has forced some to return to the rubble of their homes.


In pictures: Quake aftermath
BBC - May 29, 2006




San Francisco Earthquake of 1906 - 100 Years Later ...

1906 San Francisco Earthquake Wikipedia

The San Francisco earthquake of 1906 was a major earthquake that struck San Francisco and the coast of Northern California at 5:12 a.m. on Wednesday, April 18, 1906. Devastating fires broke out in the city and lasted for several days. As a result of the quake and fires, about 3,000 people died and over 80% of San Francisco was destroyed. The earthquake and resulting fire are remembered as one of the worst natural disasters in the history of the United States alongside the Galveston Hurricane of 1900 and Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The death toll from the earthquake and resulting fire is the greatest loss of life from a natural disaster in California's history.

Photo Gallery: San Francisco Quake - Then and Now National Geographic

San Francisco's 1906 Quake: What If It Struck Today? National Geographic
Wild and Wacky Tales from the 1906 Quake Live Science
The Great 1906 Earthquake, 100 years later USGS - April 18, 2006
San Francisco faces big shaker BBC - April 18, 2006




Earthquake Fault Under Tokyo Closer Than Expected National Geographic - July 15, 2005
Scientists have found that a major, earthquake-producing fault that runs beneath metropolitan Tokyo is closer to the surface - and potentially more dangerous - than previously thought. The boundary between two key tectonic plates just south of Tokyo was thought to be about 12.5 miles to 25 miles (20 to 40 kilometers) below the surface.




Sumatra Earthquake Three Times Larger Than Originally Thought Science Daily - February 12, 2005

Making it the second largest quake ever measured with instruments.
Also see related articles on Tsunami - December 26, 2004




Are Earthquakes Encouraged by High Tides? National Geographic - October 22, 2004
Scientists have long suspected a relationship between tides and earthquakes but have reached little consensus. Now a new study reveals that very high tides might indeed be linked with seismic activity along coasts. The team focused on activity at shallow thrust faults. The faults were an ideal test location, because their spatial orientation is generally better known, making it possible to more accurately calculate how stresses act on the fault. The faults also occur in areas where larger ocean tides occur more frequently. In study areas along the continental margins of Japan, New Zealand, Alaska, and the west coast of South America, very large tides coincide with thrust subduction-zone, or faults. Thrust faults are cracks in Earth's crust where one continental plate is rising up and over the other.




Earthquakes can be predicted months in advance Science Daily - January 13, 2004
"Earthquake prediction is called the Holy Grail of earthquake science, and has been considered impossible by many scientists," said Keilis-Borok, a professor in residence in UCLA's Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and department of earth and space sciences. "It is not impossible." "We have made a major breakthrough, discovering the possibility of making predictions months ahead of time, instead of years, as in previously known methods," Keilis-Borok said




Medium To Large Quakes Peak Every Three Years On Central San Andreas Fault Science Daily - January 12, 2004
Medium to large earthquakes occurring along the central San Andreas Fault appear to cluster at regular three-year intervals - a previously unnoticed cycle that provides some hope for forecasting larger quakes along this and other California faults.




Can Animals Sense Earthquakes? National Geographic - November 11, 2003
The belief that animals can predict earthquakes has been around for centuries. In 373 B.C., historians recorded that animals, including rats, snakes and weasels, deserted the Greek city of Helice in droves just days before a quake devastated the place. Accounts of similar animal anticipation of earthquakes have surfaced across the centuries since. Catfish moving violently, chickens that stop laying eggs and bees leaving their hive in a panic have been reported. Countless pet owners claimed to have witnessed their cats and dogs acting strangely before the ground shook barking or whining for no apparent reason, or showing signs of nervousness and restlessness. But precisely what animals sense, if they feel anything at all, is a mystery. One theory is that wild and domestic creatures feel the Earth vibrate before humans. Other ideas suggest they detect electrical changes in the air or gas released from the Earth.




GPS Technology Aids Earthquake Research November 11, 2002 - Science Daily
Scientists' understanding of the movement of the Earth's crust is being helped by new observing facility which is taking measurements that may one day help predict earthquakes.




Getting inside an earthquake BBC - July 19, 2002

Geologists in the US have broken new ground in earthquake research. In the central California town of Parkfield, the self-professed "earthquake capital of the world", a research team led by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) has begun drilling a two kilometre pilot hole at the San Andreas Fault.





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