Supermoon 2012











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Supermoon 2012 was at its peak at 11:34 p.m. EDT, when the moon was about 221,802 miles away from Earth, the Associated Press reported. That's about 15,300 miles closer than average, making the moon appear about 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter than it would appear if it were at its farthest distance during its elliptical orbit.


A supermoon is the coincidence of a full moon or a new moon with the closest approach the Moon makes to the Earth on its elliptical orbit, resulting in the largest apparent size of the moon's disk as seen from Earth. The technical name is the perigee-syzygy of the Earth-Moon-Sun system. The term "supermoon" is not an astronomical one, but one that originated in modern astrology The association of the Moon with both oceanic and crustal tides has led to claims that the supermoon phenomenon may be associated with increased risk of events such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. However, the evidence of such a link is widely held to be unconvincing.

Certain prognosticators have moved the goalposts to within 1 or 2 weeks of a supermoon to suggest a causal relationship with specific natural disasters such as the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami and the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami. However in both cases the Moon was actually farther from the Earth than average. No evidence has been found of any correlation with major earthquakes.





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